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Dr6
05-05-2014, 12:40 PM
2Hi all.

I am a part time illustrator (otherwise I am in the health industry) and have been working on a graphic novel for sometime now.

As far as the script goes, I have basically finished with the overall outline of the plot and a few details here and there. And at the same time I have started to draw the panels and am quite a few pages into the script.

I have done all the illustrations in PhotoShop PS4, with 300 dpi resolution, keeping the overall sizes of the page around 9 x 11 inches. Each panel is saved as a proper psd file, along with a high resolution jpeg back up.

Now, I understand traditional artists actually sketch these on sheets of paper and then ink them and later colors are done or the newer ones use certain graphics software and Wacom tablets.
But I am trying to do all that on my PhotoShop. And I recognize this might actually horrify some of you professionals. But my question is ; before I go any further than the 25, 30 pages I have so far done, will I be able to use these files (after I set the panels, pages, ... ) and expect them to be published in a proper ''graphic novel'' format?

Here is a sample of what I was talking about;



http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_tgp-Qa4pBc4/S84yxZWlG2I/AAAAAAAAAGU/xdcgypW7Z0g/s1600/000.jpg


So my question is would a publisher accept my psd (or even tiff) files at 300 dpi, to print? Or should I format the panels or pages in a specific form?


I appreciate any help and guidance



Thank you very much

D

Ghost
05-05-2014, 03:27 PM
Hey Dr6

I might be able to help shed some light? These days there are more and more professional comic artists that will completely create their comic digitally. Pencilling, inking, coloring, lettering..even the writing all done on the computer and then submitted in a variety of file types. So to answer your question yes its totally fine. You did good to save it at 300 dpi and in psd format. Something to consider though is that every comic publisher will use different printers to print their thousands of comics and graphic novels. They might even use multiple printing companies for various projects instead.

And different printing companies will prefer certain file types. Ive had the most luck though with printing things as PDFs. Its good to save files as psd or Ai files, because you can then resave it at various other file types once you find out what the printer requires. Also dont forget to save the file as CMYK instead of RGB colors. Most good printers will check and convert it for you, but they might charge extra.

Ive recently started up a thread where everyone can discuss things involved in creating comics and help each other out. I planned on talking a bit more in depth about the printing process in the future if it would be of help to you? http://community.comicbookresources.com/showthread.php?561-Comic-Artist-Tips-amp-Tricks

Dr6
05-08-2014, 10:57 AM
Many thanks mate.

It's such a relief to see psd is acceptable. Bcoz going back and redoing about 20+ pages all over again would have been ... well, I'd have just dropped the bloody project altogether.
But what about the size issue? The overall size of the page has been chosen around 8 x 11 inches.


As for the color, I don't remember if it's in CMYK or RGB. But I assume I can re-save them in CMYK if they're in RGB. Correct?
Anyway, very few of them have any color done. They're basically B&W for the tome being.


And I have checked tour thread. I found it very useful. I will surely participate and ask a few questions there too.
Thank you

Ghost
05-09-2014, 09:27 PM
Many thanks mate.

But what about the size issue? The overall size of the page has been chosen around 8 x 11 inches.


As for the color, I don't remember if it's in CMYK or RGB. But I assume I can re-save them in CMYK if they're in RGB. Correct?
Anyway, very few of them have any color done. They're basically B&W for the tome being.


No problem :). As far as the size, that depends on a few things. Do you plan on getting this printed yourself? If so, have you already found a printer you wanted to use?

Some printing companies will be able to accommodate nearly any dimensions, but comics are generally 6 7/8 x 10 1/2 inches (give or take). But theres no set in stone sizing rules per-say unless you work for Marvel or DC. 8x11 is about the size of a regular sheet of paper so that might not be too difficult to work out.

For just the black and white inking you dont have to worry much. But be sure to do the coloring in CMYK, Im pretty sure it can be converted if its already RGB but it may make some of the colors look odd. Just might have to do some minor correction if that happens.

Basically RGB is coloring for something that would be seen on a computer screen. And CMYK is coloring for things that will be printed, like comics. This goes more in depth: CMYK vs. RGB (http://www.cruxcreative.com/rgb-vs-cmyk-when-to-use-which-and-why/)

http://www.consolidatedlabel.com/images/2007/10/rgb-vs-cmyk-spot-color.jpg

Dr6
05-12-2014, 09:19 AM
Many thanks for the help and advise.

I have a couple of independent companies in mind and may get one of them to print it for me. But since this is my first work in this area, I wanted to finish about half of the project before I actually send them samples and the script (for copyrights issues and all, since I have taken a mythical tale and have given it a few twists and turns).
So I am not sure about the process of pitching my work to a company and wanted to know what are the acceptable formats and guidelines to make the pitch even more serious and workable.

Ghost
05-12-2014, 08:46 PM
Many thanks for the help and advise.

I have a couple of independent companies in mind and may get one of them to print it for me. But since this is my first work in this area, I wanted to finish about half of the project before I actually send them samples and the script (for copyrights issues and all, since I have taken a mythical tale and have given it a few twists and turns). (http://www.brantfowler.com/ImageComics/larsensubmissionanswers.html)
So I am not sure about the process of pitching my work to a company and wanted to know what are the acceptable formats and guidelines to make the pitch even more serious and workable.

Every company has different submission guidelines. Some wont accept them at all for legal reasons. Image gives a good general idea of what to do: Image Comics Submissions (https://imagecomics.com/about/submissions)

Here, Eric Larsen of Image Comics answers some questions about how they go about submissions: Image FAQs (http://www.brantfowler.com/ImageComics/larsensubmissionanswers.html)

CrazyOldHermit
05-13-2014, 04:41 AM
For just the black and white inking you dont have to worry much. But be sure to do the coloring in CMYK, Im pretty sure it can be converted if its already RGB but it may make some of the colors look odd. Just might have to do some minor correction if that happens.

Basically RGB is coloring for something that would be seen on a computer screen. And CMYK is coloring for things that will be printed, like comics. This goes more in depth: CMYK vs. RGB (http://www.cruxcreative.com/rgb-vs-cmyk-when-to-use-which-and-why/)

http://www.consolidatedlabel.com/images/2007/10/rgb-vs-cmyk-spot-color.jpg

Paolo Rivera has an interesting blog post (http://paolorivera.blogspot.ca/2009/08/accurate-digital-color-reproduction-in.html) on the subject. In short, he says that working in CMYK is a bad idea because the resulting files are too saturated and thus print darker. He works in RGB (with the Proof Colors turned on) and converts at the end, which gives you the acceptable ink levels for accurate printing.

Ghost
05-13-2014, 10:42 PM
Paolo Rivera has an interesting blog post (http://paolorivera.blogspot.ca/2009/08/accurate-digital-color-reproduction-in.html) on the subject. In short, he says that working in CMYK is a bad idea because the resulting files are too saturated and thus print darker. He works in RGB (with the Proof Colors turned on) and converts at the end, which gives you the acceptable ink levels for accurate printing.

That is an interesting perspective on color use. Im glad you brought this up, Ive been reading a bit more on it today and will try to experiment some. I agree with his points on the larger color gamut in RGB and its brightness. But judging from at least the Spiderman pic at the top of his article, that is some pretty dark coloring in general.

There are a few other things to consider beyond RGB and CMYK even. Im sure a pro like him already accounted for this, but monitor calibration can present some issues for brightness and color consistency. I think it is fairly common for some artists to have very bright monitors, so you may tend to draw colors even darker than you realize. I have had this problem once when making business cards with a black background. Well, that was probably a bit of color bleeding as well.

This can even be an issue with digital comics. Everyones monitors and tablets all probably have different brightness and calibration settings, so complete consistency is nearly impossible. Illustrator Frazer Irving has mentioned he combats this a bit by frequently comparing the drawn pages on his iPad before sending it off to print.

I think the biggest problem is with printing in general. Especially if you dont use a local printing company that you are familiar with. Being able to easily discuss changes and check physical proofs is invaluable. But these days it is far far less expensive to print in places like South Korea and China, even for the big companies. Thus longer waiting times for physical proofs to come overseas and language barriers etc.

Also there is the decision between digital printing, offset printing and a few others. Digital printing has seemed to come a long way and is less expensive. But to my knowledge most still use offset printing for the best color in comics. But it comes with its own issues.. there is slight inconsistency sometimes in lighter coloring or misalignment. Which is totally out of the artists hands.

Also different papers hold ink in certain ways. I think colors seem dark on glossy paper for instance compared to matte. Just something else to consider.

Ive rambled on so much I almost forgot what I was talking about lol.. basically, do whatever works best for you. Try working in both RGB and CMYK to see which prints out your coloring style best. Compare the printing to the original work on your monitor and adjust things accordingly.

Benclor
07-02-2014, 10:10 PM
You have highlighted a valid point mate and it seems like having it under discussion can help other people in getting better at their learning and at the same time with moving ahead so yeah keep it this way and surely there is a place for betterment which goes ahead.