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  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKtheMac View Post
    But ‘do mortals need gods’ isn’t the moral core of the argument. Instead it is ‘Gods have done more harm than good’ both by themselves and when mortals use gods as an excuse to make war etc. So sure the relationship isn’t clear, but it’s not about that. That is more on the solution side of the argument. Can gods actually be legitimate in the future?
    In the MU, they've saved humanity countless times. So that's not a hard argument to make

  2. #182
    Ultimate Member JKtheMac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Cool Thatguy View Post
    In the MU, they've saved humanity countless times. So that's not a hard argument to make
    They have also put it in mortal danger many times. Then there are the religious purges and wars. The premise of the story is that Fury has seen the balance of evidence and Gor was right. Like it or don’t the logic is sound.

  3. #183
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    I think Aaron's handling of the Shi'ar gods in his run (who, as far as I know, have never appeared before that arc) about sums up a lot about his view on Gods, Faith, and "worthiness," particularly when the God who puts them in their place isn't the actual God Thor but a mortal using said God's guise and powers.

    It also kind of strikes me that his use of other God's feels more in-line with the "space alien" MCU Asgardians then they do a real Pantheon.

  4. #184
    Astonishing Member DurararaFTW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKtheMac View Post
    But ‘do mortals need gods’ isn’t the moral core of the argument. Instead it is ‘Gods have done more harm than good’ both by themselves and when mortals use gods as an excuse to make war etc. So sure the relationship isn’t clear, but it’s not about that. That is more on the solution side of the argument. Can gods actually be legitimate in the future?
    Quote Originally Posted by JKtheMac View Post
    They have also put it in mortal danger many times. Then there are the religious purges and wars. The premise of the story is that Fury has seen the balance of evidence and Gor was right. Like it or don’t the logic is sound.
    If that's the argument then you don't even need to pose the question. No, they can never be legitimate in the future, no matter what they do, those dangers of the past and religious wars of the past will still have happened. Nick and Thor can watch every God do nothing but good for mortals and prevent religious conflict happening in their name every time for a million years and guess what, they still are not mortal, they have an eternity of being flawed creatures both behind them and still ahead of them and anything that has happened in the era of superhero on Midgard won't even have represented a drop in the bucket.

  5. #185
    Fantastic Member GodThor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frontier View Post
    It also kind of strikes me that his use of other God's feels more in-line with the "space alien" MCU Asgardians then they do a real Pantheon.
    ugh MCU is meh.

    at least in the comcis they are mystical at least and have traits of a God like hearing a prayer, recognizing if someone is a God or not, AKA it's not just a word like in MCU. etc.

    MCU is just... meh.

  6. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKtheMac View Post
    They have also put it in mortal danger many times. Then there are the religious purges and wars. The premise of the story is that Fury has seen the balance of evidence and Gor was right. Like it or don’t the logic is sound.
    Only if one accepts that the Gods have to shoulder the burden for the entirety of religion.

    The Earth gods haven't had large followings for thousands of years. Fear Itself was kinda bad, but that's mitigated by the fact that Odin sought to prevent it, and cleaned up afterwards. Lets not forget how Odin fought the Dark Gods on principle in Dan Jurgen's run, keeping the Celestials from wiping out humanity, and how many times did they stop Surtur from burning everything?

  7. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frontier View Post
    I think Aaron's handling of the Shi'ar gods in his run (who, as far as I know, have never appeared before that arc) about sums up a lot about his view on Gods, Faith, and "worthiness," particularly when the God who puts them in their place isn't the actual God Thor but a mortal using said God's guise and powers.
    Yeah, pretty much. All it took for the Gods to go after Thor was Loki going 'Neener neener, Thor is cooler! lol', and their followers were willing to do anything in their name

  8. #188
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    I try using an analogy to the real world to see if Aaron's story makes sense to me. Let's say the USA(Gods/Asgardians) is prosperous, advanced, a first world nation. Then say Ethiopia(Midgard/Mortals) is less prosperous, less advanced, a third world nation. Now a wealthy american(Thor) goes to Ethiopia frequently to do humanitarian work, also gives vast sums of money to help improve the lives of the Ethiopians(Mortals). After years of good humanitarian works in Ethiopia helping many some snobby, wealthy European(Gorr) who has never done anything to help anyone comes to the American(Thor) and says no Americans are worthy and America is not worthy of Ethiopia. Now how should the American respond to that statement, if it were you how would you react? Would you except the statement and turn into a sad sack, would you stop all the good work you do and become a drunk who wallows in self-pity? Should the American do that. Or would the American and you tell the European(Gorr) to go f**k himself and continue doing your humanitarian work to help the Ethiopians(Mortals) like you have always done. When I relate Arron's unworthy storyline to that analogy it just furthers my opinion that Arron's tale makes little to no sense and one has to disregard decades of past Thor stories to buy into this storyline. The very idea that the word of Gorr or Fury would cause Thor to doubt himself, to question all the countless good he has done, all the sacrifices he has made on behalf of mortals is beyond ludicrous. The Thor before Aaron would never fall so low, he would laugh in Gorr and Fury's face. But this is Aaron's Thor Odinson and that guy is a shell of his fomer self and there is a much better "Thor" wielding the hammer now.
    Last edited by The tall man; 12-07-2017 at 06:38 PM.

  9. #189

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    I'm an atheist and I want fictional gods to be important, colorful and cool. I don't need gods and other superheroes constantly dragged through the mud to empathize with them. I read plenty of stories both fiction and non-fiction about human problems. I don't need Asgardian gods, Kryptonian aliens and other ridiculously powerful characters to be deconstructed and torn down to understand them. This is a problem I find with most modern comic writers. They took what Alan Moore did with "Watchmen" and have been doing it to the entire genre for at least the past decade.

  10. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by HaveAtThee View Post
    I'm an atheist and I want fictional gods to be important, colorful and cool. I don't need gods and other superheroes constantly dragged through the mud to empathize with them. I read plenty of stories both fiction and non-fiction about human problems. I don't need Asgardian gods, Kryptonian aliens and other ridiculously powerful characters to be deconstructed and torn down to understand them. This is a problem I find with most modern comic writers. They took what Alan Moore did with "Watchmen" and have been doing it to the entire genre for at least the past decade.
    Oh this I agree with

    JA run, is imo another example of hero destruction like so many before

    I've said it before, the handling of Thor and his worthiness is nothing original at all

    janes a good story and I'm enjoying that part of it

    But I find the mechanism of Thor losing his hammer, the destruction of his relationship with it and his own self esteem to be both ridiculous in its contrite set up to move the focal point of the book and absurd in the notion of Gor's logic, Fury's whisper and regret following it, the very basic idea in and of itself

    For me there is a clear agenda being explored here from a real world view, the rights and wrongs of that view for me are irrelevant and a personal right to have, but I have no question that they have created the overarching narrative here in my opinion

    that doesn't mean it can't be enjoyed, I love some parts of it, I just don't see any denying the background to it I feel

  11. #191
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    Quote Originally Posted by The tall man View Post
    I try using an analogy to the real world to see if Aaron's story makes sense to me. Let's say the USA(Gods/Asgardians) is prosperous, advanced, a first world nation. Then say Ethiopia(Midgard/Mortals) is less prosperous, less advanced, a third world nation. Now a wealthy american(Thor) goes to Ethiopia frequently to do humanitarian work, also gives vast sums of money to help improve the lives of the Ethiopians(Mortals). After years of good humanitarian works in Ethiopia helping many some snobby, wealthy European(Gorr) who has never done anything to help anyone comes to the American(Thor) and says no Americans are worthy and America is not worthy of Ethiopia. Now how should the American respond to that statement, if it were you how would you react? Would you except the statement and turn into a sad sack, would you stop all the good work you do and become a drunk who wallows in self-pity? Should the American do that. Or would the American and you tell the European(Gorr) to go f**k himself and continue doing your humanitarian work to help the Ethiopians(Mortals) like you have always done. When I relate Arron's unworthy storyline to that analogy it just furthers my opinion that Arron's tale makes little to no sense and one has to disregard decades of past Thor stories to buy into this storyline. The very idea that the word of Gorr or Fury would cause Thor to doubt himself, to question all the countless good he has done, all the sacrifices he has made on behalf of mortals is beyond ludicrous. The Thor before Aaron would never fall so low, he would laugh in Gorr and Fury's face. But this is Aaron's Thor Odinson and that guy is a shell of his fomer self and there is a much better "Thor" wielding the hammer now.
    I completely agree. Thor suddenly doubting all that he is and that he (and other gods) have done was the most glaring part of the story; it is utterly ridiculous. I understand the view that Fury simply "revealed the truth" to him but it still makes no sense to me. It also doesn't correspond with the showing of the gods in the MU; they are typically not even interested in interacting with the mortal sphere (and there is that story in Jurgen's run where the pantheon Skyfathers all test Thor to determine if he is worthy to be a Skyfather. The criteria included and focued on caring for those below them, if I recall correctly). As for histories of religious wars and purges, even if the MU was much the same as our world, religious wars only make up a small fraction of the world's wars throughout history (somewhere between 5-10%) and human deaths are far fewer than the death tolls of modern, secular warfare. How much difference are we talking about? It doesn't add up or it's simply based on fantasy to further the storyline (certainly an option, given the format).

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