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  1. #1
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    Default How much should romance matter in superhero and action movies and shows?

    For years now, I have heard complaints about how romances in certain action and superhero movies and tv shows have distracted from the film, and how they could be removed and the story would be the same, and etc. The hate for it can become overwhelming to read. To me, as long as the romance is written well, it has a place. The main characters are people; they can fall in love or lust or whatever. It doesn't have to weaken or ruin their characters. However, I also don't mind it when some fan favorites die, so what do I know?

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    Amazing Member RyDub's Avatar
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    I mean it depends, but i don't think every Superhero movie needs a romance plot. All it is, is added drama. Most comic book nerds act like we are a level above because we like stories of superpowered people, but pretty much every comic book has a romance plot which essentially all of them are Soap operas with superheroes and villains. It has its place though I don't think every single superhero movie needs one.

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    Astonishing Member AJBopp's Avatar
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    I think it matters a great deal. There needs too be a motivation for the hero too do what he does beyond beating up bad guys, and love interests also invest the audience more into the story by raising the stakes.
    Why yes, I AM a Mark Goodson/Bill Toddman production.

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    King of Wakanda Midvillian1322's Avatar
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    If it adds to the story and is done well. Thor and Jane was just wasnt working for some reason and Ragnarok was all the better for not having it. But then it has alot of Bromance in it. Thor and Loki, Thor and Hulk

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    It's a good subplot to have but it can become routine and cliche without a new take/spin. Basically it's just like any other writing trend and it shouldn't be the only one you fall back on.

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    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AJBopp View Post
    I think it matters a great deal. There needs too be a motivation for the hero too do what he does beyond beating up bad guys, and love interests also invest the audience more into the story by raising the stakes.
    One example off the top of my head: I find it really difficult to separate Bruce Banner's story from Betty Ross, and it makes me a little sad that the MCU dropped her off Hulk's radar. Never bought into Black Widow as having a comparable connection.

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    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    One example off the top of my head: I find it really difficult to separate Bruce Banner's story from Betty Ross, and it makes me a little sad that the MCU dropped her off Hulk's radar. Never bought into Black Widow as having a comparable connection.
    I was really disappointed that those rumors about Liv Tyler being in Infinity War didn't turn out to be accurate .

  8. #8
    Death becomes you Osiris-Rex's Avatar
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    It makes them seem more human and relatable instead of just being characters in a video game. Though interestingly in the '70s Wonder Woman TV series it was all business with Diana,
    especially the 2nd & 3rd season. As far as I could tell, she never had a love interest. Though often the guest characters were motivated by love or jealousy. So even if the main character
    is an automaton, there will probably be some sort of love interests going on somewhere in the show. It goes beyond just superhero shows. Even in cop, lawyer, firefighters, military shows
    some sort of hanky panky is always going on.

  9. #9
    Boisterously Confused
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    It depends on the character or the story.
    • Spider-Man and Superman almost need love interests, both to provide them with something they have to give up (or at least risk) to fulfill their responsibilities, and to given them grounded, human problems.
    • In a similar, but distinct way, a love interest can create an anchor in humanity for Thor or Wonder Woman.
    • For Batman, its largely superfluous, unless you're using a Talia or Catwoman to point out just how lonely the character is, and how rare a person it takes to actually reach him (Rachel Dawes and Vicky Vale were never really up to that). But that's one story out of hundreds possible for Batman that don't need a romance.
    • Peggy Carter gave Captain America something to lose, not through threat to her life, but through risking his own. But as with Batman, that's only one story to tell about the character where the rest can be romance-free (Sharon Carter was incidental to the story in both of her film appearances).
    • For Reed Richards, it's integral as his story is all about family.
    Last edited by DrNewGod; 12-19-2017 at 12:00 PM.

  10. #10
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    Well in general romance can add to the audience relating too or understanding the Hero's motives for why they do what they do. But, in some cases it gets a bad rap due to poor writing or poor execution of the story line.

    Take Arrow for example. The Olicity romance gets hate because a lot of fans feel that on again off again tired drama literally destroyed the show and bogged it down for seasons. To me I blame writing for fans not liking a romance. It's writers job to make the viewer want to like them.

  11. #11
    Boisterously Confused
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidfresh512 View Post
    Well in general romance can add to the audience relating too or understanding the Hero's motives for why they do what they do. But, in some cases it gets a bad rap due to poor writing or poor execution of the story line.

    Take Arrow for example. The Olicity romance gets hate because a lot of fans feel that on again off again tired drama literally destroyed the show and bogged it down for seasons. To me I blame writing for fans not liking a romance. It's writers job to make the viewer want to like them.
    Actor chemistry can do it too; Ollie and Laurel was never easy to buy. That said, you're right; without a good script, it's DOA.

  12. #12
    Astonishing Member AJBopp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    Actor chemistry can do it too; Ollie and Laurel was never easy to buy. That said, you're right; without a good script, it's DOA.
    I would argue that Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone made something out of nothing.
    Why yes, I AM a Mark Goodson/Bill Toddman production.

  13. #13
    Astonishing Member Powerboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuinnFillory View Post
    For years now, I have heard complaints about how romances in certain action and superhero movies and tv shows have distracted from the film, and how they could be removed and the story would be the same, and etc. The hate for it can become overwhelming to read. To me, as long as the romance is written well, it has a place. The main characters are people; they can fall in love or lust or whatever. It doesn't have to weaken or ruin their characters. However, I also don't mind it when some fan favorites die, so what do I know?
    It depends entirely on who the target audience is. Generally, if it's a theatrical movie billed as action/ superhero, just enough romance to remind us that these characters have real lives.

    If it's, say, "Smallville", cram it full to the brim with romance. Make the main plot the romance and the action/ superhero stuff the subplots (which is largely what they did). Then, when all of us guys whine about how it's not "our" Superman, just say, "Then maybe you should watch something designed to be interesting to you instead of, mostly, the other 50% of the population".
    Superman was a beacon to the world. He didn’t just save people, he made them see the best part of themselves.

  14. #14
    Astonishing Member SpiderClops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    It depends on the character or the story.
    • Spider-Man and Superman almost need love interests, both to provide them with something they have to give up (or at least risk) to fulfill their responsibilities, and to given them grounded, human problems.
    • In a similar, but distinct way, a love interest can create an anchor in humanity for Thor or Wonder Woman.
    • For Batman, its largely superfluous, unless you're using a Talia or Catwoman to point out just how lonely the character is, and how rare a person it takes to actually reach him (Rachel Dawes and Vicky Vale were never really up to that). But that's one story out of hundreds possible for Batman that don't need a romance.
    • Peggy Carter gave Captain America something to lose, not through threat to her life, but through risking his own. But as with Batman, that's only one story to tell about the character where the rest can be romance-free (Sharon Carter was a incidental to the story in both of her film appearances).
    • For Reed Richards, it's integral as his story is all about family.
    Pretty much this.

    I'm a sucker for romance, but I know not every character needs it.
    “Indifference and neglect often do much more damage than outright dislike.”
    -Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

  15. #15
    Death becomes you Osiris-Rex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powerboy View Post
    It depends entirely on who the target audience is. Generally, if it's a theatrical movie billed as action/ superhero, just enough romance to remind us that these characters have real lives.

    If it's, say, "Smallville", cram it full to the brim with romance. Make the main plot the romance and the action/ superhero stuff the subplots (which is largely what they did). Then, when all of us guys whine about how it's not "our" Superman, just say, "Then maybe you should watch something designed to be interesting to you instead of, mostly, the other 50% of the population".
    Does seem to be mostly guys complaining about the romance in superhero movies and TV shows. Most women seem to like it and for some that is a big reason they watch the shows.

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