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  1. #1
    Astonishing Member WebLurker's Avatar
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    Default Thread Drift: Dan Slott's Legacy

    Quote Originally Posted by SpideyCeo View Post
    Slott > Any story from Late JMS and that guy who wrote Kickass.
    Fair enough; personally, I think that Brian Michael Bendis's Ultimate Spidey) > Dan Slott' 616 Spidey (and comic Spideys in general). Will be interesting to see where history places Slott in the pantheon of Spidey writers.

    Quote Originally Posted by SpideyCeo View Post
    Im gonna miss him and not read amazing until Parker Industries comes back.
    This is exactly where us fans of pre-OMD Spidey (and iterations that follow in the spirit of that) have been for the past decade or so. We should toast our mutual distaste for how the wheel has turned for the comics.
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    X-23: "I know there are people who disapprove... Guys on the Internet mainly."
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    Quote Originally Posted by WebLurker View Post
    Fair enough; personally, I think that Brian Michael Bendis's Ultimate Spidey) > Dan Slott' 616 Spidey (and comic Spideys in general). Will be interesting to see where history places Slott in the pantheon of Spidey writers.
    At the risk of hyperbole, he'll probably be regarded in the elite sense that Lee/Ditko and Roger Stern share based on the impact to the franchise, and his legacy will be debated as feversihly as OMD is debated even today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miles To Go View Post
    At the risk of hyperbole, he'll probably be regarded in the elite sense that Lee/Ditko and Roger Stern share based on the impact to the franchise, and his legacy will be debated as feversihly as OMD is debated even today.
    I am not so sure about that. In my opinion, his legacy will be twofold: his longevity on the title and Superior Spiderman. That’s really about it; he has certainly been a durable writer but his popularity/“approval rating” is nowhere near the rarified air that the Lee or Stern runs have.
    I miss Kevin Nichols. Not as much as bacon, but still...

  4. #4
    Mighty Member Lukmendes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
    I am not so sure about that. In my opinion, his legacy will be twofold: his longevity on the title and Superior Spiderman. That’s really about it; he has certainly been a durable writer but his popularity/“approval rating” is nowhere near the rarified air that the Lee or Stern runs have.
    At the very least, a few years from now he'll have a lot less haters, hell, if in the times I've seen similar situations are any hint, some of his haters may even become fans, on the other hand, the opposite may happen too.

    I'll probably always remember Slott's run as "interesting ideas, questionable characterizations", which is what I think right now, but who knows, maybe I'll see something else I'm missing right now, which can be either good or bad.

  5. #5

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    I think Slott will be fondly remembered.

    Right now, there's a bit of a backlash against him because he's been the main voice on Spider-Man for years. I'd imagine it will be a bit different when he's looked at as one of several writers.

    Superior Spider-Man is likely to go down as a fan-favorite story, on the level of the Hobgoblin mystery, and the Harry Osborn Green Goblin saga.

    Some of his event stories seem to have been popular (New Ways to Die, Spider Island, Spider-Verse) he has written a few really acclaimed stories (Spider-Man/ Human Torch, No One Dies) while introducing a few characters with staying power (Mr. Negative, Silk, Spider-Gwen.)

    I'd expect him to be treated with a similar level of respect to David Michelinie, another guy with a long run, who worked with several top artists (Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen and Mark Bagley VS John Romita Jr, Marcos Martin, Ryan Stegman, and Humberto Ramos.) Slott didn't introduce anything to the series as big as Venom, although I think his style is going to be less dated, partly because it's so idiosyncratic.
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    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
    I am not so sure about that. In my opinion, his legacy will be twofold: his longevity on the title and Superior Spiderman. That’s really about it; he has certainly been a durable writer but his popularity/“approval rating” is nowhere near the rarified air that the Lee or Stern runs have.
    I think his "legacy" will also be in the characters/concepts that he created but that other writers really developed and made into what people recognize or like them as.

    You'll also probably see Slott's ideas adapted but in an almost completely different way from what they were in the comics. So a good idea man, even if he struggled to really properly use those ideas in the comics.

    But I agree the thing his run will probably be best remembered for is Superior.
    Some of his event stories seem to have been popular (New Ways to Die, Spider Island, Spider-Verse) he has written a few really acclaimed stories (Spider-Man/ Human Torch, No One Dies) while introducing a few characters with staying power (Mr. Negative, Silk, Spider-Gwen.)
    I don't know about "staying power" since Silk's been in limbo since her comic ended and the upcoming video game will probably be the most done with Negative since Big Time or when he popped up in the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon for one episode.

    I think the concept of Spider-Verse proved more popular then the actual story of Spider-Verse.

    So, again, I think Slott will be remembered to a degree for his ideas, if not for the execution.

  7. #7
    Really Feeling It! Kevinroc's Avatar
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    I think he stayed on a little too long. And I think that will be reflected when people discuss his run in the years to come.

    He also drove a number of event storylines (Spider-Island, Spider-Verse, Clone Conspiracy) that will probably be viewed as growing collectively worse in quality as they moved forward.

    His run will be defined by Superior. And he probably should have ended with that. If he had gone out on that note, I think his run would have been looked at more fondly. The only story after Superior that people collectively seem to like is Renew Your Vows. And Slott pulled as far away from that as humanly possible when it was over.

  8. #8

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    Has there been confirmation that Slott’s gone, other than the solicit?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet Spider-Man View Post
    Has there been confirmation that Slott’s gone, other than the solicit?
    Slott says they'll be more info coming, nothing outright confirmed, but nothing denied either.

  10. #10
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevinroc View Post
    His run will be defined by Superior. And he probably should have ended with that. If he had gone out on that note, I think his run would have been looked at more fondly. The only story after Superior that people collectively seem to like is Renew Your Vows. And Slott pulled as far away from that as humanly possible when it was over.
    I think it's very rare that a writer sticks around after a "Death and Return" storyline and it's as good as what came before.

    Ed Brubaker on Captain America is certainly one example off the top of my head. I mean, I liked the stories he did once Steve became Captain America again, but they just weren't on the same level as what had come before.

    Even when Scott Snyder kept doing Batman he went to his own spinoff book rather then keeping on the main title.

  11. #11
    Really Feeling It! Kevinroc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frontier View Post
    I think it's very rare that a writer sticks around after a "Death and Return" storyline and it's as good as what came before.

    Ed Brubaker on Captain America is certainly one example off the top of my head. I mean, I liked the stories he did once Steve became Captain America again, but they just weren't on the same level as what had come before.

    Even when Scott Snyder kept doing Batman he went to his own spinoff book rather then keeping on the main title.
    I've made this argument before. And even used Brubaker's Captain America as an example. Once a writer has a character literally conquer death, everything else feels like a step down.

    The only thing that didn't seem to get that reaction was Renew Your Vows, which was separated from where Slott had taken the book before the mini and where he took the book following it.

  12. #12
    Spectacular Member JGC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miles To Go View Post
    Slott says they'll be more info coming, nothing outright confirmed, but nothing denied either.
    With the likely return of the FF, Slott would be perfect to take over that title. All the chips are there: his use of the Baxter building in ASM, his work on Silver Surfer (who will be a supporting character) and his excellent handling of the FF characters in the past. Pair him with Mark Bagley and that’s a win for sure!

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  13. #13
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    Renew your vows, Superior Spider-Man and Spider-verse are the stories of Dan Slott that will define his solo run on the character. I would add Spider-Island and possibly New Ways to Die to the list as well.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    I think Slott will be fondly remembered.

    Right now, there's a bit of a backlash against him because he's been the main voice on Spider-Man for years. I'd imagine it will be a bit different when he's looked at as one of several writers.
    Slott's run will be very fondly remembered. For a lot of younger fans, his Spider-Man is their Spider-Man, the definitive article, the version that all others will be judged by.

    For older fans like myself, I appreciate the extreme level of care he brought to the book. I may not have always agreed with his interpretation of the character but I always respected that his POV was from a fan's perspective and that his knowledge of Spidey ran deep.

    And as for any backlash, keep in mind that Slott was the first Spidey writer of the social media age, the first to have to weather daily public criticism of his run - something that would have even made Stan's run look controversial or divisive. I do think that it will be easier for some fans to fully appreciate Slott's run once it's completed and recedes into the past a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Superior Spider-Man is likely to go down as a fan-favorite story, on the level of the Hobgoblin mystery, and the Harry Osborn Green Goblin saga.
    I think it's certain that Superior Spider-Man is the benchmark of Slott's run. I will disagree with those who think he should've left after that, though.

    I've enjoyed his run since then quite a bit, even if the stories haven't been nearly as seismic as SSM. I definitely don't think it's like Brubaker's Cap run where it really deflated once Steve came back.

    I loved Parker Industries, for example, and would have liked to see it stretch out a bit longer. Also, I think Renew Your Vows is going to endure as a favorite.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Some of his event stories seem to have been popular (New Ways to Die, Spider Island, Spider-Verse) he has written a few really acclaimed stories (Spider-Man/ Human Torch, No One Dies) while introducing a few characters with staying power (Mr. Negative, Silk, Spider-Gwen.)
    He also introduced Anti-Venom, Agent Venom, Clash, brought back Ben Reilly, and updated classic rogues like Doctor Octopus and The Lizard (with some changes clearly coming to the Green Goblin before Slott leaves).

    In the case of Ock and the Lizard, I wonder whether anyone is going to run with them post-Slott. I'm slightly bummed that Slott himself won't be the one to pick up where he left off with The Lizard as any story featuring him is bound to be twisted.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    I'd expect him to be treated with a similar level of respect to David Michelinie, another guy with a long run, who worked with several top artists (Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen and Mark Bagley VS John Romita Jr, Marcos Martin, Ryan Stegman, and Humberto Ramos.) He didn't introduce anything to the series as big as Venom, although I think his style is going to be less dated, partly because it's so idiosyncratic.
    It's going to be strange to think about Slott as a former Spidey writer. The duration of his run has made him practically synonymous with the character. But I think he'll get his due respect and his run will endure as a benchmark era. Certainly whoever takes over has very big shoes to fill.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof. Warren View Post
    Slott's run will be very fondly remembered. For a lot of younger fans, his Spider-Man is their Spider-Man, the definitive article, the version that all others will be judged by.
    That's what I was getting at. Dan is a whole generation's Stan Lee or Chris Claremont. I've had issues with his run, but he's produced more idea content than anyone since Stan back in the day, he's a marketing machine's dream come true, and we're seeing the impact of that in cartoons and video games. I won't miss him on the title, but I would miss him as a contributor. I don't see we'll be seeing the last of him in the latter field anytime soon.


    And as for any backlash, keep in mind that Slott was the first Spidey writer of the social media age, the first to have to weather daily public criticism of his run - something that would have even made Stan's run look controversial or divisive. I do think that it will be easier for some fans to fully appreciate Slott's run once it's completed and recedes into the past a bit.
    Dan is notorious for saying Gerry Conway's game-changing run would have been savaged more so in the age of social media than even the frenized storm it endured back in the 70s.

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