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  1. #46
    Senior Member middenway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunken View Post
    Hello all, I have question regarding Hellboy and B.P.R.D. you guys might help me with.
    I want to start reading some Hellboy and B.P.R.D, so my question is can I start to read B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs and then afterward read the Hellboy storys collected in the Library Edition?
    The thing is that I'm abit short on money and the Hellboy Library Editions cost quiet a bit of cash, and I can find the B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs Omnibuses pretty cheap. So I just wonder if I can start with the cheap one, and then when I get more money read the Library Editions.
    Yeah, B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs is quite accessible for new readers. Anything you've missed from Hellboy is covered by the characters in conversation. Definitely pick up those omnibuses. They're awesome.

  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunken View Post
    Hello all, I have question regarding Hellboy and B.P.R.D. you guys might help me with.
    I want to start reading some Hellboy and B.P.R.D, so my question is can I start to read B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs and then afterward read the Hellboy storys collected in the Library Edition?
    The thing is that I'm abit short on money and the Hellboy Library Editions cost quiet a bit of cash, and I can find the B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs Omnibuses pretty cheap. So I just wonder if I can start with the cheap one, and then when I get more money read the Library Editions.
    Yes, you won't have a problem. I did something similar; I got the first volume of the library edition and the got the Plague of Frogs omnibuses and I never felt I have missed something.

  3. #48
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    Thanks for the answers. I added Plague of Frogs 1 and 2 in the cart for next order, 3-4 seems to be sold out for now, but alteast something to start with.
    This gonna be fun.

  4. #49
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    What are the HC collections for Hellboy?

    Are these all?

    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 3
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 4
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 5
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 6
    Hellboy: Weird Tales
    Hellboy: Midnight Circus
    Hellboy: House of the Living Dead
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 1
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 2
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 3
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 4
    B.P.R.D. 1946 - 1947 - 1948

  5. #50
    Senior Member middenway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal View Post
    What are the HC collections for Hellboy?

    Are these all?

    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 3
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 4
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 5
    Hellboy Library Edition - Volume 6
    Hellboy: Weird Tales
    Hellboy: Midnight Circus
    Hellboy: House of the Living Dead
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 1
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 2
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 3
    B.P.R.D. Plague of Frogs - Volume 4
    B.P.R.D. 1946 - 1947 - 1948
    You're just missing Hellboy Library Editions 1 and 2, but otherwise, yeah, that's all of them so far. I don't know if Hellboy: Midnight Circus or Hellboy: House of the Living Dead are going to be recollected in a hardcover omnibus or library edition, but if they are, it's a long way off.

    If you have any questions about the content, check out these links at the Hellboy Wiki:
    Last edited by middenway; 03-31-2015 at 06:38 PM.

  6. #51
    Junior Member Kees_L's Avatar
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    If you would ever happen to stumble upon the Art of Hellboy HC artbook from 2003, I would recommend that too.

    And in 2014 when Hellboy turned 20 Hellboy: The First 20 Years HC was published.

    Highly limited but real swell would be the 1995 Seed of Destruction HC with slipcase S&N edition, both as the 2014 IDW Hellboy Artist Edition.
    Last edited by Kees_L; 04-19-2015 at 07:00 AM.
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  7. #52
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    Hi! I 've read the first 3 books of Plague of Frogs and I was wondering about Liz's age and appearance. She is supposed to be born in 1962. That puts her in 50s. However in the books and previews I've seen she doesn't look to be in her 50s. Is she geeting older in a slower rate for some reason, or it's just how she is draw? It not exactly a newcomer's question, but I thought it's better not to make a new thread just for that. Thanks!

  8. #53
    Senior Member middenway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new_onslaught View Post
    Hi! I 've read the first 3 books of Plague of Frogs and I was wondering about Liz's age and appearance. She is supposed to be born in 1962. That puts her in 50s. However in the books and previews I've seen she doesn't look to be in her 50s. Is she geeting older in a slower rate for some reason, or it's just how she is draw? It not exactly a newcomer's question, but I thought it's better not to make a new thread just for that. Thanks!
    The events of B.P.R.D.: The Black Flame take place in March 2006. Up until that point the series had been told in real time. After that, things slip out of sync. (Killing Ground to King of Fear covers a period from September to early January, though it was nearly three years in publishing time.) Time gets really tricky from then on. Whenever a specific date is referenced, the comic usually references a date relatively concurrent with the release date of the comic, but internally that much time has not past. For example Abe is out of action for two years in B.P.R.D. Hell on Earth in real time, but in the comic that was only four months. And Fenix would have aged four years since her introduction, but she's only aged one or two, tops. If you look at the events relative to each other, the modern Hell on Earth stuff would be taking place about 2009-2010-ish. So Liz would be about 48.

    Honestly, as soon as it gets past 2006, I try not to think about time too much. It gets murky very quickly. Pre-2006 stuff is watertight though.

    The flashback stories always kick off with a little text box somewhere saying what the date is, but the modern day stuff never did. That was fine while it was in sync, but as it slipped out of sync, it becomes a problem. If a character says it's 2010, it throws the reader. They suddenly think they're reading a flashback. So to keep things simple it is always set now... but not really. It's one of those things where the time is deliberately inaccurate so that it draws less attention to itself.
    Last edited by middenway; 04-19-2015 at 01:29 AM.

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by middenway View Post
    The events of B.P.R.D.: The Black Flame take place in March 2006. Up until that point the series had been told in real time. After that, things slip out of sync. (Killing Ground to King of Fear covers a period from September to early January, though it was nearly three years in publishing time.) Time gets really tricky from then on. Whenever a specific date is referenced, the comic usually references a date relatively concurrent with the release date of the comic, but internally that much time has not past. For example Abe is out of action for two years in B.P.R.D. Hell on Earth in real time, but in the comic that was only four months. And Fenix would have aged four years since her introduction, but she's only aged one or two, tops. If you look at the events relative to each other, the modern Hell on Earth stuff would be taking place about 2009-2010-ish. So Liz would be about 48.

    Honestly, as soon as it gets past 2006, I try not to think about time too much. It gets murky very quickly. Pre-2006 stuff is watertight though.

    The flashback stories always kick off with a little text box somewhere saying what the date is, but the modern day stuff never did. That was fine while it was in sync, but as it slipped out of sync, it becomes a problem. If a character says it's 2010, it throws the reader. They suddenly think they're reading a flashback. So to keep things simple it is always set now... but not really. It's one of those things where the time is deliberately inaccurate so that it draws less attention to itself.
    Thanks. So Liz ages normally, or her fire keeps her younger?

  10. #55
    Junior Member Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new_onslaught View Post
    Thanks. So Liz ages normally, or her fire keeps her younger?
    I'd believe there is no mistake in how continuity for both Liz and Kate and Hellboy spells out they wouldn't merely be aged or act or look like but the freshest of ex-teenagers.

    As of 'Hellboy: Seed of Destruction' Hellboy for instance's been balding heftily plus he looks like the devil so anything to his appearance looks nothing like a dreamy twenty-year-old star-quarterback type of young man.

    It cannot be true that the age of fourty or above would similarly need to be proving any sort of antithesis to beauty or human vitality in the slightest however.

    Even if characters such as Kate or Liz are well into their fourties for a highly significant part of the books, it's not that they could or should be considered "too old" to perform in whatever way.

    I bet no artist would ever have been trying to characterize age as some kind of deficiency, so it cannot be true that any comic characters are only drawn as looking like they'd be in their twenties only.

    But if you look how age transpires in movies or television or the limelight it really seems as if audiences just don't consider what age would really look like, since the people proving accomplished stars among such would hardly be merely in their twenties for certain.

    Not in television, not in cinema, not the arts or be it in the real world would beauty or idolisation merely correlate to people at their youngest per se.

    Hellboy-related books seem to treat anything not necessarily or merely the same as how the most popularized superhero comics would. Like how characters wouldn't need to be young or dashing per se. Whereas being beautiful or dashing wouldn't automatically stand or fall with being young of age?
    Last edited by Kees_L; 04-19-2015 at 07:32 AM.
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  11. #56
    Senior Member middenway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by new_onslaught View Post
    Thanks. So Liz ages normally, or her fire keeps her younger?
    I assume she ages normally. No one has said anything to suggest otherwise. She always looked her age to my eyes when Guy Davis drew her. I take any variance as just being an artist's personal style.

    Plus, I don't know, I kind of like that she's in her late forties. And that Kate is in her early fifties. That's part of what's interesting about these characters to me.

  12. #57
    Junior Member Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by middenway View Post
    I assume she ages normally. No one has said anything to suggest otherwise. She always looked her age to my eyes when Guy Davis drew her. I take any variance as just being an artist's personal style.
    Agreed.
    Purely as characters, I'd think that the readers come to know Kate as not an ordinary agent but more rather a senior one. As being not an agent but a brought in expert or researcher more rather. Taking on somewhat of a maternal or at least senior role towards any of the agents as from the getgo.

    Whereas Elisabeth Sherman would seem much if not totally robbed of her own childhood or innocence by definition as a person, once you consider how she'd have been incapable of throwing a tantrum without immediately incinerating everything in her viscinity including her own family eversince her reaching the age of eleven! That's a thing.

    And even as a forty-something-year-old woman, not everything about her will have to look but old and barren, but by definition her character wouldn't neededly be all virginal or teensy neither, I'd think.
    But then what would innocence or virginity look like anyway? Miley Cyrus? Rihanna? Ralph Macchio? A hobbit?
    SLINT / Mike Mignola / Walt Whitman / Arthur Louriť / Dr. Pepper

  13. #58
    Newbie Member kevin_sidharta's Avatar
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    Hey guys, is there any plan for Hellboy to be republished in paperback omnibus format like BPRD?
    I dont want to buy paperbacks because i read that the bindings in paperback are bad.
    The library editions are too expensive IMO.

    Thanks

  14. #59
    Junior Member Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin_sidharta View Post
    Hey guys, is there any plan for Hellboy to be republished in paperback omnibus format like BPRD?
    I dont want to buy paperbacks because i read that the bindings in paperback are bad.
    The library editions are too expensive IMO.

    Thanks
    I thoroughly enjoy Dark Horse's trade paperback format for the Mignolaverse, so much that I have been collecting them all eversince they first appeared and none of their bindings appear bad whatsoever.

    Except for my copy of 'the Art of Hellboy' softcover since it seems too big and too thick to not be cracking at the spine. Or maybe it just got used too much. But I have it in HC as well as remaining flawless.

    Since to me also the singles both as the hardcovers appear exquisite enough that I've been collecting those too. Although I'm yet to collect the BPRD omnibuses, so I couldn't comment on those.
    SLINT / Mike Mignola / Walt Whitman / Arthur Louriť / Dr. Pepper

  15. #60
    Newbie Member kevin_sidharta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kees_L View Post
    I thoroughly enjoy Dark Horse's trade paperback format for the Mignolaverse, so much that I have been collecting them all eversince they first appeared and none of their bindings appear bad whatsoever.

    Except for my copy of 'the Art of Hellboy' softcover since it seems too big and too thick to not be cracking at the spine. Or maybe it just got used too much. But I have it in HC as well as remaining flawless.

    Since to me also the singles both as the hardcovers appear exquisite enough that I've been collecting those too. Although I'm yet to collect the BPRD omnibuses, so I couldn't comment on those.
    That's one superb answer. Im start to questioning whether i should buy the paperback editions of hellboy or not, maybe i will. Perhaps the book in the review i read is faulty. Thank you kind sir.

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