Page 304 of 304 FirstFirst ... 204254294300301302303304
Results 4,546 to 4,559 of 4559
  1. #4546
    Senior Member Mikekerr3's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    1,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ExcelsiorPrime View Post
    Just goes to show you how ingrained and strong racism is in America. When a minority can go to any other country and be treated less racist. I mean everyone experiences prejudices but to have an institution in perpetual motion insuring its survival is mindblowing.
    You think that Japan is somehow less racist than the US? , I lived there and find that an amazingly delusional idea, Hell the Japanese are even pretty openly bigoted if you are Ainu or Okinawan, much less if you are even a third generation ethnic Korean.

  2. #4547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Froggy View Post

    But uh man to chime in on the Eddie Murphy thing, I always heard stories why he'd never do these snl reunion things. I remember learning about Chevy chase and bill Murray's fight from that book. I think I also learned about Damon Wayans short time on the show
    Yeah, I didn't know WHY Damon Wayans got fired from the show back in the day, until I read the book. It was pretty crazy.

  3. #4548
    ........ ExcelsiorPrime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Guts over Fear
    Posts
    1,671

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikekerr3 View Post
    You think that Japan is somehow less racist than the US? , I lived there and find that an amazingly delusional idea, Hell the Japanese are even pretty openly bigoted if you are Ainu or Okinawan, much less if you are even a third generation ethnic Korean.
    I can only go by the people I know that personally went.
    My webcomic Updated Weekly
    Twitter
    Blog

  4. #4549
    Senior Member Double 0's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Quick question.

    I've heard plenty of times that the independent non-cape side of comic books is doing fine, especially in contrast to superhero comics.


    But how does one get into that side of comics and be successful? Namely minority creators? It's an area I have very little experience in.

  5. #4550
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    748

    Default

    I can't think of Chevvy Chase anymore without thinking about that roast. Where the guys dissing him truly meant it.

  6. #4551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vic Vega View Post
    I can't think of Chevvy Chase anymore without thinking about that roast. Where the guys dissing him truly meant it.
    I had heard that Chevy was one of Hollywood's biggest assholes, but man..after reading the Live from New York book, it kind of cements it.

  7. #4552
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    956

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Double 0 View Post
    Quick question.

    I've heard plenty of times that the independent non-cape side of comic books is doing fine, especially in contrast to superhero comics.


    But how does one get into that side of comics and be successful? Namely minority creators? It's an area I have very little experience in.


    It might be even harder for a minority to break into an indie company than the big two. Might as well self publish.

  8. #4553
    Senior Member Double 0's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Via Joseph Phillip Illidge (it's already up on the main page, but if you're like me and don't go to the main page, here you go!)

    In the June issue of The Atlantic, an article by Ta-Nehisi Coates called "The Case for Reparations" was published. It was a history lesson, unflinching dissection, and a call to action all in one, about the many ways in which Black people were unfairly denied the opportunity to own a home. Additionally, it detailed the ways in which such practices continue to this day, in clever and disgusting ways, and profiled some of the people who fought against the system in years past.

    I'm not going to try and equate the racial inequities of the comic book industry with the centuries-old discrimination mechanism that makes a case for reparations. After all, to my knowledge, no person of color ever had their life threatened, or was killed, within the comic book industry because of their ethnicity.

    That said, we can look at the comic book business as a landscape of creativity, defined in part by the vast presence of the intangible assets called "intellectual properties."

    We are now at a point in the global culture where the ideas created for, and realized within, comic books are respected by everyone as stories of value and resonance, due the same level of respect as various ideas first realized in the formats of prose, film and television.


    The graphic novel, "Watchmen," written by Alan Moore and illustrated by Dave Gibbons, was voted one of Time's Top 100 Novels in 2009, more specifically one of the best English-language novels published since 1923, the starting year for Time.

    Last February, "The Walking Dead," a television series based off of a long-running Image Comics series created by Robert Kirkman, was the number one television show for the coveted 18-49 demographic, beating out one thousand and four hundred other shows for that spot.

    The Marvel Studios film, "Captain America: The Winter Soldier," based on a Marvel Comics storyline by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting, is one of the top-grossing films this year on a worldwide scale.

    These three examples are significantly different, as one is corporation-owned, one is creator-owned, and one is corporation-owned but identified in connection with its creators to such a degree that it is viewed as creator "owned", respectively. But all of them came from comic books, and none of them were created or co-created by people of color.

    Don't mistake that for a complaint. It's an observation that should and must serve as fuel and inspiration.

    Because the comic book industry is a business that does not provide or allow equal opportunities for writers of color to pen tales for company-owned intellectual properties, or to publish creator-owned works through high-profile publishers, the potential for windfall in the forms of money and exposure is reduced a great deal.

    Writer Chuck Dixon, formerly one of the most prolific authors of the Batman line of comics, received monies due to a character he co-created called Bane who appeared in the Warner Bros. film "The Dark Knight Rises." Chuck Dixon does not own any percentage of the Bane character, and yet he received a check. Dixon was also featured in a variety of mainstream press outlets during the film's release.

    Money.

    Exposure.

    Both of which yield opportunities, and opportunities can lead to more money and exposure, while also providing the means for future opportunities for others, family and otherwise.

    Legacy power.


    "Mighty Avengers" art by Greg Land.
    As far as I can tell, the comic book community of color, comprised of the fans, creators, and employees of color in the business and consumer groups, can be broken down into four categories:

    The complainers, each and all of whom will focus their sentiment and thoughts on how Marvel Comics and DC Comics are "The Man," doing them wrong on a daily basis and not giving them their forty acres and a mule, their fair share.

    While a number of their points are surely valid, the truth is that words will not stop a locomotive, or get it to change its course.

    The apathetic, who don't want any part of this Black, Latino, Asian comics and heroes talk. Having zero interest in an agenda or cause that brings unwanted attention and comes with risk, they want to be left alone like the people Howard Beale referred to in his famous spiel in Paddy Chayefsky and Sidney Lumet's film "Network."

    It's understandable. Who wants to risk promotion within the ranks, the reward of a sweet 401K package and benefits, or good standing in a well-known comic book company with a potential shot at a name character, just by being viewed and defined by their ethnicity, in an industry dominated by Caucasian males?

    The fighters. Those people whose actions as a creator and/or consumer are in opposition to Marvel and DC Comics. Operating on the independent scene exclusively or almost, they challenge the system.

    To challenge the system, your work must be as good or engaging as the work within the system. To support independent works, you must take the time to investigate and find them.

    The last group is the navigators, those people from diverse groups who manage to operate both in the mainstream and independent circles, and succeed in their creative and business endeavors.

    Despite the inequities and lack of fairness in the business of comic books, and entertainment in general, the navigators are making an impact, and they're not going to be stopped.

    And with that as an example and inspiration, the mission in front of us can be intuited, ascertained, but maybe it needs to be clearly stated. Anyone can choose their words, their mantra, and since every person should not ask others to do something they would not do themselves, these are the words I choose:

    The Mission… is to develop one's ability to its highest potential, and use it in service of helping to realize the equal creative and business playing field all people from diverse groups deserve.

    The mission is not exclusive to people of color, or heterosexuals, or people who are cisgender. Various people are living the mission, in some cases without specific intent but by virtue of who they are as people.


    Maya Angelou.
    We have walked through The Color Barrier together, and now, on this side, I'm going to sharpen my focus on the navigators, across demographics, the ones who are succeeding and paving the way for others to succeed. Action instead of complaints. Efforts instead of apathy. Fighting with endurance. Growth through trials.

    After all, I could care less about The Falcon sleeping with a 24-year old woman.

    On May 28, Maya Angelou passed away at the age of 86.

    On July 1, Walter Dean Myers passed away at the age of 76.

    The leaders of a new age are among us.

    Let's talk to them.

    Let's become them.

    Joseph Phillip Illidge

  9. #4554
    Senior Member Froggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Azores
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell D. View Post
    Yeah, I didn't know WHY Damon Wayans got fired from the show back in the day, until I read the book. It was pretty crazy.
    Yeah, like it was hard to believe for me at first, and on the Chevy Chase thing, that was kinda sad? Like yea roasts are harsh but the clips I saw of that were ROUGH
    Brad Pitt for Grifter in a WildCATS movie

  10. #4555

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Double 0 View Post
    Quick question.

    I've heard plenty of times that the independent non-cape side of comic books is doing fine, especially in contrast to superhero comics.


    But how does one get into that side of comics and be successful? Namely minority creators? It's an area I have very little experience in.
    The advice I got was that sales on comics are based on three things: the characters, the creators and the concept. If you're an unknown creator, you need a compelling hook. See Invincible (Superhero's teenage son finally gains powers), Y The Last Man (serious look at what happens to the world when the men suddenly die), The Walking Dead (Zombie movie that never ends), and Scott Pilgrim (Slacker has to fight his girlfriend's evil exes as if they're all video game characters.

    It also helps to have a unique style. Jonathan Hickman's The Nightly News was different from any other comic on the stands. That quickly brought him to Marvel's attention.

    Sometimes it helps to do something extreme. Sam Humphries got attention with Our Love is Real. Mark Millar's early work involved a fictional return of Christ.

    A riff on something you love can be effective. Michael Fiffe's Copra was a take on Suicide Squad. Francesco Francavillia's The Black Beetle shows his love of pulp stories. Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie's Phonogram was inspired by their love of britpop.

    For an unknown, a mini series/ one-shot may be a better way to get attention, since you're unlikely to have the resources for a monthly title.

    I'm not sure if there are any particular pitfalls for minority creators. There may be a greater concern that readers (and potential employers) will mistake the views of your characters for your own.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  11. #4556
    Geek Strong Style Smoov-E's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    California
    Posts
    483

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell D. View Post
    Yeah, I didn't know WHY Damon Wayans got fired from the show back in the day, until I read the book. It was pretty crazy.
    What book is this?

  12. #4557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Darrell D. View Post
    I just did a reread of that book. It really is fascinating.
    And massively entertaining, too. The first time I read it, I finished it in two days over a weekend. Just couldn't put it down. More anything else, you get a sense about what a grind the show is each week.

  13. #4558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smoov-E View Post
    What book is this?
    Live From New York: An Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live by Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller. Well worth picking up.

  14. #4559
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    373

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    My suggestion would be to offer higher pay for teachers willing to go to a high-needs school, or to offer the same pay for teaching less classes (which might not result in teachers spending less time working, given the problems coming up with lesson plans in the poorest school districts). But there will likely be union opposition to that, since it requires paying some people more.
    Unions don't really work in Right to Work states like Texas.

    It has been talked about and shot down many times because it would be unfair to the teachers at the good districts and schools.

    You can't punish a teacher for going to work at a top school versus a bad one. Because what is going to happen is someone (or someones) will do what they can to keep that school CRAPPY so the money will keep coming.

    The issue with many of these schools is not the kids. It's the ENVIRONMENT of the neighborhood. A lot of the schools that are low performing in my city are at that stage not only do to inexperience teachers but a lack of concern (outside of SPORTS) from the community.

    We keep reminding the community-if you WANT it-you have to ASK for it and ACT on it. And it doesn't cost them money.
    Last edited by skyvolt2000; Today at 04:42 PM.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •