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  1. #1
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    Default READING LIST: Celebrating LGBT Pride in Comics

    Casey Gilly rounds up some of her favorite LGBT and non-normative comics in honor of Pride Month.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
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    Interesting to note how many of these seem to be written by straight guys.

  3. #3

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    I know these lists are meant to start a discussion rather than be definitive, but no Stuck Rubber Baby? What? Howard Cruse may be the single most significant creator in pioneering queer comics, and Stuck Rubber Baby has constantly been in print since its original publication, something few comics can claim.

    (I am okay with Jaime's Maggie and Hopey stories not being on the list since the author mentioned she didn't want to overlap with her list of strong female characters from last month with this list, even though there's no question Jaime's L&R should be on a list like this.)
    Last edited by FanboyStranger; 06-18-2014 at 02:30 PM.

  4. #4
    This Earth's Donna Troy Donna M.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    I know these lists are meant to start a discussion rather than be definitive, but no Stuck Rubber Baby? What? Howard Cruse may be the single most significant creator in pioneering queer comics, and Stuck Rubber Baby has constantly been in print since its original publication, something few comics can claim.

    (I am okay with Jaime's Maggie and Hopey stories not being on the list since the author mentioned she didn't want to overlap with her list of strong female characters from last month with this list, even though there's no question Jaime's L&R should be on a list like this.)
    I'm not! Hopey and Maggie aren't the only queer characters in the book y'know! What about Terry Downe or Doyle Black? What about almost ALL of Luba's kids? What about Fritz and Pipo? They're all Love and Rockets characters, too! They deserve to have their stories spotlighted!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna M. View Post
    I'm not! Hopey and Maggie aren't the only queer characters in the book y'know! What about Terry Downe or Doyle Black? What about almost ALL of Luba's kids? What about Fritz and Pipo? They're all Love and Rockets characters, too! They deserve to have their stories spotlighted!
    I'm okay with it only because the author mentioned she wasn't going to overlap the lists when she replied in the discussion thread last month. She acknowledged that Strangers in Paradise could have been on the list of strong female characters, but might be on this list, which it was. Jaime's L&R was on last month's list, but should have been here, too, and we could include Beto's stuff as well. Obviously, she intends these lists to be a starting point for discussion rather than definitive, and perhaps such major omissions are a way to get discussion started.

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    This Earth's Donna Troy Donna M.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    I'm okay with it only because the author mentioned she wasn't going to overlap the lists when she replied in the discussion thread last month. She acknowledged that Strangers in Paradise could have been on the list of strong female characters, but might be on this list, which it was. Jaime's L&R was on last month's list, but should have been here, too, and we could include Beto's stuff as well. Obviously, she intends these lists to be a starting point for discussion rather than definitive, and perhaps such major omissions are a way to get discussion started.
    Okay, I'll give you that. But Strangers in Paradise owes its very existence to Love and Rockets, so it boggles me that it should get the mention instead.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna M. View Post
    Okay, I'll give you that. But Strangers in Paradise owes its very existence to Love and Rockets, so it boggles me that it should get the mention instead.
    I totally agree. I find SiP to be a pale shadow of L&R.

  8. #8
    Mattress Tester t hedge coke's Avatar
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    I wish Moto Hagio would make it on more of these lists, but that's just because a) the books could use the sales bump and b) she can make me cry in like four pages or believe love will beat everything even if it ends tragically, like I'm nine years old.

    And, now I'm curious about trans and drag and multiple partner relationships amongst comics talent, because that really doesn't get delved into very far past a gag mention of Morrison in wigs or a brief breakdown by Greg Rucka of what it means to ID as a woman and be into women... or some idiot complaining that this or that woman "talks and acts like a man in a dress, they should get surgery!" Rachel Pollack's Doom Patrol really spoke to kid-me much more than Morrison's, not that I don't like his, and the gender stuff and underlying anxieties and absurdities of social anticipations was a big part of that (also, the fox stuff was just funny and the Coagula/Cliff romance was cute). But none of the women who were there at the launch of Vertigo get too much of a close look, and Rachel Pollack, possibly, gets less than the others, when it comes to comics.

    Bit sad, and a lot of mineable territory. That's all I'm saying.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by t hedge coke View Post
    And, now I'm curious about trans and drag and multiple partner relationships amongst comics talent, because that really doesn't get delved into very far past a gag mention of Morrison in wigs or a brief breakdown by Greg Rucka of what it means to ID as a woman and be into women... or some idiot complaining that this or that woman "talks and acts like a man in a dress, they should get surgery!" Rachel Pollack's Doom Patrol really spoke to kid-me much more than Morrison's, not that I don't like his, and the gender stuff and underlying anxieties and absurdities of social anticipations was a big part of that (also, the fox stuff was just funny and the Coagula/Cliff romance was cute). But none of the women who were there at the launch of Vertigo get too much of a close look, and Rachel Pollack, possibly, gets less than the others, when it comes to comics.

    Bit sad, and a lot of mineable territory. That's all I'm saying.
    I've come around to your way of thinking on Pollock's DP run. They're not great comics, but they certainly are interesting ones. It's one of those cases where the run that preceded it completely overshadows what Pollock was trying to do. I think one of the problems with the failed Vertigo launch books was that their requirement seemed to be "we have something to say" without seeing whether the creators could actually say it competently. But there's a lot of radical ideas being approached, and comics haven't really caught up to that wild, unrestrained stream of new ideas. I've really come to enjoy Ann Nocenti's Kid Eternity for its ideas, but I have to concede that those first few issues were something of a mess from a craft standpoint.

  10. #10

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    I really do wish that DC would reprint Alan Moore's Top 10. The hugely expensive Absolute Edition seems to be the only readily available print edition.


    Even Comixology only has the first 12 issue series and not the subsequent OGN or two minis.

  11. #11
    Mattress Tester t hedge coke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FanboyStranger View Post
    I've come around to your way of thinking on Pollock's DP run. They're not great comics, but they certainly are interesting ones. It's one of those cases where the run that preceded it completely overshadows what Pollock was trying to do. I think one of the problems with the failed Vertigo launch books was that their requirement seemed to be "we have something to say" without seeing whether the creators could actually say it competently. But there's a lot of radical ideas being approached, and comics haven't really caught up to that wild, unrestrained stream of new ideas. I've really come to enjoy Ann Nocenti's Kid Eternity for its ideas, but I have to concede that those first few issues were something of a mess from a craft standpoint.
    I think, too, a lot of the other stuff, the minis and oneshots, were things that had been commissioned elsewhere, or had a much longer genesis. But, Pollack's and Collins' work read pretty much the way their prose does, it's just not the usual pacing/MO for mainstream comics. I don't know that that's good or bad (Nocenti, too, tends to be pretty loose and all over the place, unless she's deliberately on a theme, like Typhoid). Morrison said something about most of the men at early Vertigo writing comics-as-plays or plays-as-comics, and I think that's probably true enough, especially Milligan, DeMatteis, Gaiman and Morrison himself, but the women seemed to be more prose writers coming to comics in that modern prose sensibility at a time when the most prose-aligned mainstream comics were was vaguely 19th Century tones, Roy Thomas/Chris Claremont territory.

    I mean that Collins and Pollack don't "scene" their stories the way a play is staged, which Gaiman and DeMatteis definitely do, and much of that era of Milligan is.

    Which is a messy thought, but anyway, 's'where I'm approaching it from at the moment.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member Brave Sir Robin's Avatar
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    I have been reading Girls with Slingshots for years and Danielle Cosetto is an amazing comic writer. She handles LGBT issues as well as a hidden one, asexuals. It is a fantastic comic because
    a) it is funny. she is a master of the four panel gag strip.
    b) the characters are wonderfully human and diverse.
    c) Corsetto addresses a lot of things in humorous, insightful, and gentle ways.
    d) when she wants to be, she writes just wonderfully romantic stories. She is typically more goofy.
    e) It is funny. She is a very, very funny writer.

    She has also written an Adventure Time story that is manga style.

    Give it a shot if you are looking for a fantastic web comic.

  13. #13
    Senior Member RobertoDaCosta's Avatar
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    Bring back Xavin!
    Bring back Ultimate Dazzler!!

  14. #14
    Senior Member the4thpip's Avatar
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    Nothing at all from Milestone comics? They had Donner and Blitzen in both Shadow Cabinet and Heroes, they had Static's gay friend, they had Fade and Masquerade in Blood Syndicate and the awesome Marisa Rahm in Deathwish, just off the top of my head. If you wanted LGBT characterization in comics in the 90s, Milestone was your best bet.

  15. #15

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    I'd throw Gotham Central on the list of additional reading. Renee Montoya is one of my favorite LGBT characters in comics. Nice to see Batwoman made the additional reading list already.

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