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  1. #16
    Spectacular Member GhostPirate's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LifeIsILL View Post
    I'd rather have it like this than the Claremont dialogue-heavy way. Reading the Claremont X-Men or Simonson's Thor run was a chore simply because the excessive amount of unnecessary CRAP (not exposition, crap) the characters would spout. It adds nothing to the story and is an insult to readers.
    That "crap" was actually this thing once known as "character development", and people complaining about writers using their words to tell a story being referred to as "readers" is, ironically, actually more of an insult to readers.

  2. #17
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    Though obviously it doesn't start there, I would say a big turning point was Ultimate Spider-Man, which set out to make "decompression" part of its whole strategy. The first arc took an origin story that took 10 pages to tell and spent 4 issues on it. And instead of turning people off, it actually came off as a fresh approach to storytelling at a company that was known up till then for a rather old-fashioned writing style (and was still using very compressed storytelling in most of its flagship books).

    Soon after USM launched there was a management shakeup at Marvel and Joe Quesada came in with a mandate to modernize the writing style at the company, so USM became a sort of model for how Marvel comics should be written, and the old compressed style became rare at Marvel, while DC was already moving in that direction.

  3. #18
    Astonishing Member Nick Miller's Avatar
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    When writers started writing 3,4, or 5 books a month. Along with tv/film projects, and maybe a job too.

    Come up with one story, and write the dialogue for 6 months. Sooo much work!

    Correct me if im wrong, but simonson, claremont, wein, wolfman, gaiman, f miller, moore
    These guys worked on one book at a time, maybe 2. Enough time to craft a story.

  4. #19
    Astonishing Member Nick Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GhostPirate View Post
    That "crap" was actually this thing once known as "character development", and people complaining about writers using their words to tell a story being referred to as "readers" is, ironically, actually more of an insult to readers.
    Along with thought bubbles and narration, which drew the reader into the world.

    Imagine reading a novel or short story, and its all dialogue, lol

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Miller View Post
    Along with thought bubbles and narration, which drew the reader into the world.

    Imagine reading a novel or short story, and its all dialogue, lol
    Except that comics are inherently different from prose. The art of the comic is a dynamic part of the storytelling process. Comics that rely heavily of thought balloons or narrator captions ofter are just relaying information that should be clear from the art. For instance, how many comics have you read where the characters are explaining their powers as they are using them? Or describing the action as it is occurring? TV tropes has section on "Talking is a free action" and "Wall of Text" to show examples of how they can be used poorly.

    The skill of the writer can minimize these weaknesses or bypass them all together. PeterDavid, Roger Stern, or Fabian Nicieza can write a character or story (done in one or serialized) that can appeal to any type of reader.

    Also remember that some of the greatest stories from any period are the longer stories. Stories like the Dark Phoenix Saga, Demon in a Bottle, or the original Hobgoblin story are all done over many issues. I would also say that it would be impossible to tell those stories in a single issue and have them be nearly as effective.

  6. #21
    Incredible Member RumpusMagoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gurkle View Post
    Though obviously it doesn't start there, I would say a big turning point was Ultimate Spider-Man, which set out to make "decompression" part of its whole strategy. The first arc took an origin story that took 10 pages to tell and spent 4 issues on it. And instead of turning people off, it actually came off as a fresh approach to storytelling at a company that was known up till then for a rather old-fashioned writing style (and was still using very compressed storytelling in most of its flagship books).

    Soon after USM launched there was a management shakeup at Marvel and Joe Quesada came in with a mandate to modernize the writing style at the company, so USM became a sort of model for how Marvel comics should be written, and the old compressed style became rare at Marvel, while DC was already moving in that direction.
    I would agree with you, but I'd also add that the 90's art style of splash pages and cool posing also contributed to a slowing down of story, as well as downgrading the medium of the sequential art that made it famous.

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