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Thread: Dracula Untold

  1. #46
    Senior Member Pyrebomb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angilasman View Post
    Werewolf and vampire myths used to share a lot of features (being almost synonymous with each other sometimes), and yes: silver traditionally has been used against a variety of beings, including vampires. The reason different things have been canonized as being part of vampire or werewolf mythology is because of books like Dracula and films like the Universal monster movies, which sampled mythology and also made stuff up.



    Werewolves weren't linked to the full moon until... wait for it... the Universal monster movies! In Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man.
    Both were considered strigoi, since ghost brought up that particular legend. Somebody who was a werewolf (strigoi) in life was bound to become a vampire (strigoi-mort) in death. Another common cause of strigoi-mort was not to receive the sacraments associated with death/be buried in consecrated ground or to be ex-communicated. The historical Vlad Tepes was ex-communicated from the Eastern Orthodox Church, and that is the cause of him coming back as a vampire in the Dark Prince book/movie. Vlad lived during the Crusdaes. So much of his life was tied up in religion. As such, I am totally fine with holy relics being a weapon against him.

    I'm less okay with the silver aspect. It just gives them too many weaknesses. Back when these legends were still very much believed in, only the aristocracy and very well-to-do individuals were likely to own silver. Everybody else was screwed. Today, pretty much everyone has a sterling something-or-other in their home. It's even used to line mirrors (which may be a secondary reason for vampires not appearing in them, though the most often cited reason is the lack of a soul). I always thought garlic was a bit silly, too.
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  2. #47
    Senior Member Hiromi's Avatar
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    Garlic has been attributed purification or medicinal properties since Ancient Egypt and was considered protection against supernatural forces(often Vampires in paticular) in a lot of societies throughout history, it's hardly surprising that it should become an anti vampire symbol.
    Last edited by Hiromi; 07-08-2014 at 01:44 PM.

  3. #48
    Still a Sapient Devil Vakanai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
    I agree. And honestly, I think that is what universal hopes to do. This is just the first film in a series. The next could take place hundreds of years in the future for all we know. Universal wanted to make the Wolfman reboot be a series, but since it didnt earn enough plans were dropped.

    As others have already mentioned in this thread Universal essentially has created their own monster mythology at this point. It would be impossible to wholly recreate Lugosis Dracula unless you have a time machine. His voice, physical appearance and mannerisms were unique to him as an actor. I believe he even was the one who decided Dracula had a opera cape as he also played the character on stage. Then there is also the fact he was filmed in black and white.

    Im glad you mentioned Monster Squad. I think that is probably my favorite interpretation of Dracula to date. He was arguably even more bad*ss than Lugosi's version. Everyone knew who he was, he had the look and turned into a bat. Other than that the character was pretty different.

    I don't expect a duplicate of Lugosi, obviously. But he was just a trend setter/archetype that set a sort of type or style of Dracula that followed through with Hammer's Lee and Monster Squad and many other versions through the decades. Sure, each actor brings something different, but they still follow a recognizable Dracula style. We haven't seen that style done well in a while (that Van Helsing movie tried sort of, but failed in the 'done well' part by a country mile).

    That 30-ish years later Monster Squad may still have the best version of that sort of Dracula is disappointing.

    And maybe the new Universal movie might bring that style back, but it wasn't evident in the preview.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hiromi View Post
    Garlic has been attributed purification or medicinal properties since Ancient Egypt and was considered protection against supernatural forces(often Vampires in paticular) in a lot of societies throughout history, it's hardly surprising that it should become an anti vampire symbol.
    Also of note for garlic, it was a useful tool for real world vampire 'slayers' as it were. Back in the day, if a dead person was believed to have become a vampire, they'd dig him up and stake/dismember/burn/desecrate-in-general the body. Sometimes these dead bodies smelled like you'd expect dead things to smell like, garlic is a strong odor that though maybe not as great as perfume is preferable to death stink. Open coffin, bring garlic to nose, perform vampire killing duties.
    Or at least that's what I've heard from somewhere.
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  4. #49
    Senior Member Hiromi's Avatar
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    It's also been used as a natural insect repellent, malaria symptoms would sometimes be taken signs of vampire feedings, people who rubbed garlic on their skin at night wouldn't get sick, and bingo, folklore is born.

  5. #50
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    There's also the simple fact that they were largely children's stories. People made them up based on vague imagined fears, then promptly made up fifty-zillion easily-acquired weaknesses to assuage their fears.

  6. #51
    Senior Member Pyrebomb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelC View Post
    There's also the simple fact that they were largely children's stories. People made them up based on vague imagined fears, then promptly made up fifty-zillion easily-acquired weaknesses to assuage their fears.
    They were not children's stories. People whole-heartedly and unironically believed in vampires. By the time Eastern Medieval superstitions reached Western Europe, there was a mass hysteria. The graves of people suspected to be vampires were desecrated and there are even accounts of living people being staked in this period of panic. Just do a search for 18th Century Vampire Controversy.
    SHSO: Polite Earthen Despair

  7. #52
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    Why 18th century , even now - in many eastern european countries , the vampire myth is still very real.

    http://abcnews.go.com/International/...ry?id=17831327

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