Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 121
  1. #61
    Ultimate Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    8,939

    Default

    I actually remember Jason and the Scorchers being on MTV



    An old Dylan cover. Fun trivia: "To live outside the law you must be honest" was the tagline to The Batman and the Outsiders comic.
    Last edited by ed2962; 03-16-2017 at 03:07 PM.

  2. #62
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Lefty Frizzell with his monster hit from 1959: "Long Black Veil"


  3. #63
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Speaking of Lefty Frizzell, in the late 1940s he became friends with Ray Price, who was just breaking into the industry as a songwriter. Frizzell helped Price get established in Nashville, where he became close friends with Hank Williams. (When Hank's wife kicked him out of the house for drunkenness, he moved in with Price.) Price went on to become a major star, and he in turn mentored the young Willie Nelson when he was starting out. Here's Ray Price with one of his hits, "Crazy Arms".


  4. #64
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    6,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seismic-2 View Post
    Speaking of Lefty Frizzell, in the late 1940s he became friends with Ray Price, who was just breaking into the industry as a songwriter. Frizzell helped Price get established in Nashville, where he became close friends with Hank Williams. (When Hank's wife kicked him out of the house for drunkenness, he moved in with Price.) Price went on to become a major star, and he in turn mentored the young Willie Nelson when he was starting out. Here's Ray Price with one of his hits, "Crazy Arms".

    I believe Lefty had a hand in helping Merle Haggard at his start, too (though Wynne Stewart was the Hag's biggest mentor). As for Ray Price (who also gave Roger Miller his first break, BTW), very early songs of his sound like ol' Hank himself. What a journey he made from that time to when I first heard him back in the early '70s!
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

    Pre-CBR Reboot Join Date: 10-17-2010

    Pre-CBR Reboot Posts: 4,362

  5. #65
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    6,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seismic-2 View Post
    Lefty Frizzell with his monster hit from 1959: "Long Black Veil"

    My favorite Lefty karaoke song. Saginaw, Michigan is also great.
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

    Pre-CBR Reboot Join Date: 10-17-2010

    Pre-CBR Reboot Posts: 4,362

  6. #66
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    From 1936: the "Big Band" Western swing sounds of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys, with "Steel Guitar Rag"


  7. #67
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    6,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by seismic-2 View Post
    From 1936: the "Big Band" Western swing sounds of Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys, with "Steel Guitar Rag"

    Aha! Take it away, Leon!
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

    Pre-CBR Reboot Join Date: 10-17-2010

    Pre-CBR Reboot Posts: 4,362

  8. #68
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Let's have another one from Lefty Frizzell - "If You've Got the Money I've Got the Time", from 1950.


  9. #69
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    A fine example of the "Bakersfield sound": Buck Owens with "Together Again", from 1964


  10. #70
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    We need to add some more female vocalists to this thread, so here's Loretta Lynn with one of her hits, "Don't Come Home A-Drinkin' "


  11. #71
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Another female vocalist to add to the thread: Jeanne Pruett, with "Satin Sheets"


  12. #72
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    And it would be a mistake to leave out Connie Smith, here with her first big hit "Once A Day"


  13. #73
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    And for a duet, here are Jean Shepard and Ferlin Husky in 1953 with one of the most "plumb pitiful" songs ever, "Dear John"


  14. #74
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    6,890

    Default

    Despite being born in Brooklyn and living on Long Island during my formative years, my family and I grew up on C&W. My father was a fan of the music as a kid (how many Brooklynites listened to the Grand Old Oprey like he did back then?), while my mother couldn't stand the pre-Nashville Sound stylings of Hank Sr., Kitty Wells, Ernest Tubb, etc. However, she started listening to it by the late '60s and became a fan of it herself (but she still hates the real old stuff to this day ). So by the time I started noticing the radio around 1973 on WHN 1050, country music was really the only music we listened to in our car.
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

    Pre-CBR Reboot Join Date: 10-17-2010

    Pre-CBR Reboot Posts: 4,362

  15. #75
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Darknight Detective View Post
    Despite being born in Brooklyn and living on Long Island during my formative years, my family and I grew up on C&W. My father was a fan of the music as a kid (how many Brooklynites listened to the Grand Old Oprey like he did back then?), while my mother couldn't stand the pre-Nashville Sound stylings of Hank Sr., Kitty Wells, Ernest Tubb, etc. However, she started listening to it by the late '60s and became a fan of it herself (but she still hates the real old stuff to this day ). So by the time I started noticing the radio around 1973 on WHN 1050, country music was really the only music we listened to in our car.
    Yeah, I was just thirteen, you might say I was a
    Musical proverbial knee-high
    When I heard a couple new-sounding tunes on the tubes
    And they blasted me sky-high
    And the record man said every one is a yellow sun
    Record from Nashville
    And up north there ain't nobody buys them
    And I said, "But I Will"
    - John Sebastian, "Nashville Cats", recorded by The Lovin' Spoonful in 1966

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •