View Poll Results: Which is more important to the franchise?

Voters
28. You may not vote on this poll
  • Teenage Peter is more important

    15 53.57%
  • Adult Peter is more important

    13 46.43%
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 38
  1. #1

    Default Teenage Spider-Man vs Adult Spider-Man Which is more important to the franchise?

    One thing that bugs me is how Marvel makes a big deal out of Spider-Man being a teen hero even though he's been an adult throughout most of the history of the franchise.

    Peter was only in high school for the first 28 issues. Most of the important story developments happened once he entered collage. Important characters to the franchise such as Mary Jane, Harry, and Gwen were introduced during the collage/adult era, and important stories such as "The Master Planner", "Death of George Stacy", "The Death of Gwen Stacy", and so many more happened during this time period.

    This is often considered the golden era of Spider-Man especially when Ditko left and John Romita took over leading the book to mainstream popularity.

    So do people agree with me that Adult Peter is more important to the franchise or do you think that the teen hero angle is more important?
    Undo One More Day, bring back the marriage, and make Spider-Man great again
    Renew Your Vows is the only good Spider-Man book on the market nowadays
    http://spider-warrior5287.deviantart.com/
    http://vampfox666.tumblr.com/

  2. #2
    Mighty Member Celgress's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,518

    Lightbulb

    From a marketing point of view Teenage Spider-Man hands down. There is a reason why almost every interpretation of Peter places him in high school. He is the premier youth superhero after all.
    Last edited by Celgress; 03-18-2017 at 10:52 PM.
    "You'll never learn to fly now 'til you're standing at the cliff."

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Celgress View Post
    From a marketing point of view Teenage Spider-Man hands down.
    I'd say that the success of the 90's animated series and the Sam Raimi movies show that you don't need teenage/high school Peter Parker for Spider-Man to market the character.
    Undo One More Day, bring back the marriage, and make Spider-Man great again
    Renew Your Vows is the only good Spider-Man book on the market nowadays
    http://spider-warrior5287.deviantart.com/
    http://vampfox666.tumblr.com/

  4. #4
    Incredible Member LordMikel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    612

    Default

    Historically, High school shows do better than college shows. A statistic I read once. It is probably that same mentality which prompts high school Peter Parker to return again and again.
    A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.
    ― Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless


    "That's the problem with our opposition they keep thinking nobody could possibly be as stupid as we are. Fools 'em every time."
    ―Lando Calrissian[src]

  5. #5
    Incredible Member WebLurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    978

    Default

    Both?

    Look at it this way, the teenage years are where it starts, that's where the groundwork is laid. However, the important supporting characters, stories, all the the stuff that really defines the mythos, are in the adult years. That's become so ingrained to the point that pretty much every adaptation using a high school setting cheats and put characters like Mary Jane, Gwen Stacy, Harry Osborn, Green Goblin's ID as Norman Osborn, Venom, you name it, in that era.

    So, the moral of the story? I think it's that both are important and offer fodder for good stories (I for one want to see new stories using both settings). However, I submit this; the fact that high school adaptations seem to usually filter the adult years through a teen lens to create their stuff (case in point, the Ultimate Spider-Man comics have far more in common with the pre-OMD adult years in 616 than anything else) strongly argues that the latter is where the meat of the franchise is located.

    (Also, while one can have their preferences -- high school setting does offer unique POVs, usually in regards in how Spider-Man interacts with the rest of the superhero community -- I've found that most people who insist that the teen years are the important part usually argue that youth is the core concept of the character. As that's a patently incorrect read of the franchise -- need I say comes with great power? -- I don't find that viewpoint very convincing.)

    As far as the argument that most adaptations use the high school years, I think it has to do more with starting at the beginning than anything else. Many of those adaptations even moved on or were planning to move on anyways.

  6. #6
    Mighty Member Blackest Knight's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles CA
    Posts
    1,215

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WeirdSpider View Post
    I'd say that the success of the 90's animated series and the Sam Raimi movies show that you don't need teenage/high school Peter Parker for Spider-Man to market the character.
    Seconded. Adult Peter Parker/Spider-Man was a hero and a man I admired and respected.

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member boots's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    2,446

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LordMikel View Post
    Historically, High school shows do better than college shows. A statistic I read once. It is probably that same mentality which prompts high school Peter Parker to return again and again.

    that's interesting. don't suppose you have a link? i know a lot of tv shows lose audience as they move the setting from high school to college but that could also be a case of natural audience attrition over seasons.

    generally speaking, i agree with what celgress is saying: that in the media at large marvel is currently enjoying success with peter as a high school character. in their roster of big icons (thor, capt america, hulk etc) he's the only one that fits that category.
    troo fan or death

  8. #8
    Astonishing Member DieHard200904's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Backwoods of Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,942

    Default

    It appears that at least to Marvel, Teenage is a big thing for Spider-Man, considering that the MCU version is a teenager in HS, and the Animated TV Shows beginning with spectacular have him as a teenager. He was also a Teen in the Ultimate Spider-Man comics as well. Since the movie audience is definitely bigger than the comic book audience, from an estimate, I will be interested to see how Homecoming fares.

    Me personally, I like him as a college student the most and like to see him in a struggle to make it to class after busting up a villain. Very disappointed that Superior Spider-Man really rushed the grad school bit, because I would get some laughs of him as a grad student and Spider-Man, and not Otto in his place.
    Last edited by DieHard200904; 03-19-2017 at 04:16 AM.

  9. #9

    Default

    Teenage Peter, hands down.

    It is worth noting that many of the adaptations still feature the relatively young college age Spidey.

    Youth was one of the things that distinguished Peter for other superhero leads. It seems to me there are two ways to look at Spider-Man, which guide your preferred direction for the direction for the series. He is either meant to be the young hero, or the hero who you've watched grow up. In either case, it is important that he started out young.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  10. #10
    World's Greatest Hero blackspidey2099's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    167

    Default

    While adult Spidey's is a hands down better interpretation, Marvel has made it so teen Peter is much more important to the franchise, fortunately. Unless/until adult Peter features more heavily in movies, TV shows, and video games, that is unlikely to change.

  11. #11
    Incredible Member LordMikel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    612

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boots View Post
    that's interesting. don't suppose you have a link? i know a lot of tv shows lose audience as they move the setting from high school to college but that could also be a case of natural audience attrition over seasons.

    generally speaking, i agree with what celgress is saying: that in the media at large marvel is currently enjoying success with peter as a high school character. in their roster of big icons (thor, capt america, hulk etc) he's the only one that fits that category.
    Googling a few different articles (I only liked this one reall). One did point out that is true for US audiences primarily.

    https://www.quora.com/Why-do-there-s...llege-students

    It might not have been a statistic, but an article like this I read. Everyone goes to high school, not everyone goes to college. High school kids have disposable income. They are still considers kids and not adults like people in college.
    A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.
    ― Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless


    "That's the problem with our opposition they keep thinking nobody could possibly be as stupid as we are. Fools 'em every time."
    ―Lando Calrissian[src]

  12. #12
    Elder Member DebkoX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    5,319

    Default

    Hmm. Teenager is more important in the sense of appealing to teens, but adult is important as you need progression.
    That is the land of lost content, I see it shining plain, the happy highways where I went and cannot come again.

  13. #13
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    16,590

    Default

    I'd say the former growing into the latter is more important to the franchise rather then just one or the other.

    Spectacular started him in high school but planned to progress him into college, adulthood, and eventually into marriage.

    I understand to a degree why Marvel over-emphasizes and focuses on Peter as a teenager, but I feel like they're also missing something or not fully doing their character justice in not showcasing him more as an adult and a man.

  14. #14
    Incredible Member suemorphplus209's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Someplace where there's many, many, trees...
    Posts
    708

    Default

    Does anyone have the details on how Marvel Studios got the rights to Spidey. To me anyways, it avoids a lot of plot holes to write off teen Peter, who only got his powers in the summer of 2015, to explain why he wasn't around for the previous MCU events.

    As for the rest, Marvel doesn't let Peter Parker grow up with you, you will age past him. If it gets you pissed that he doesn't serve as a virtual you, there are other options for your entertainment.
    Currently Following: Batman, Detective Comics, Dark Knight 3, Flash, Amazing Spider-Man, Multiversity, Spider-Man, X-Men

    BRING BACK THE OLD WOLVERINE!!!

  15. #15
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    16,590

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by suemorphplus209 View Post
    As for the rest, Marvel doesn't let Peter Parker grow up with you, you will age past him. If it gets you pissed that he doesn't serve as a virtual you, there are other options for your entertainment.
    Well, I grew up with an adult-in college-Spider-Man, so I've never really needed him to be a "virtual me" .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •