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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntoKent17 View Post
    Post Crisis (Modern Age) Superman started at 25 years old. Along with Bruce.

    The Death happened in December of Year 13 in the detailed continuity (23 Years long), story-arc by story-arc. So he was around 38 when he died.

    In the DC compressed and official chronology (15 Years long), the death happened in Year 10. So, officially, he was around 35 when he died.

    In the New 52... well... thank God the New 52 era has come to an end.

    In the post Reborn continuity, the jury is still out... but since the idea is to bring the pre-flashpoint earth back (with modified origins) there is a strong possibility Clark (and Bruce) started his carrer around between 22-25 yo.

    Lois' age was never clear. I think it's fair enough to consider her a bit younger than Clark in every continuity. Maybe a couple years.
    I always thought of Lois as a bit older than Clark. Honestly I like how New 52, or at least Grant melded the origins and have Clark started in his early twenties to be honest, despite the confusing 5 years origin concept. (The same reason I gravitated towards Superman: Earth One and It's Superman who had started off Clark as Superman at either 20-21, or Smallville who had Clark start as the Blur in season 8 at 21-23 but still became Superman at 25) as opposed to his late twenties-thirties like and had a 15 year career as Superman.

  2. #17
    Spectacular Member Chris24601's Avatar
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    Like everyone's been saying, probably about 22 in the current continuity. Based on the 'everything counts' and some supplemental material from Johns' SO and follow-up run which stated that Lois was an obscure junior reporter prior to her landing the Superman interview (in order to mirror her Golden Age start) I'd peg her as being 19 when Superman debuted (like she was at the start of the Golden Age) having graduated early from high-school and college (via raw talent plus a tremendous desire to get out from under Sam Lane's roof).

    I'm gonna further go out on a limb and suggest that Doomsday happened no later than year three (with the end of year two being a likely prospect) and we know from the recent 'this is your life' story that they skipped right to the wedding after his return instead of dragging it out through several other story arcs (including Dead Again and the Lori Lemaris/breakup non-sense) like they were forced to by tv show politics so Jon was born no later than year five and possibly as early as year three.

    Thus present day is somewhere between year 13-15 and Superman is 35-37 and Lois is 32-34. Also, Jimmy's gotta be at least 29 (more likely 31-33) since I can't see him even getting an internship before he was 16 (with 18 more likely) in the modern world (vs. the 1940's where a 10-13 year old copyboy was at least not ridiculous).

  3. #18
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    "This is your life"... What story line are you referring to?

  4. #19
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    As of 1971, Superman was supposed to be 29 and stay that way. Same with many of his JLA co-stars, including Batman. In the same year, BATMAN 232 has Bruce reflecting on his origins and musing that he was barely of voting age when he first became the Batman (i.e. 21). This doesn't leave a lot of time for the World's Finest heroes to have had all their adventures--whch even by then were considerable.

    I know that, pre-Crisis, there was at least one story where young Clark went to Metropolis to intern at the DAILY PLANET (well not intern, but whatever they called it back then), where he met Lois Lane for the first time who was doing the same thing. And they were probably both around 15 or 16 in that story. Not the only first meeting with Lois in the pre-Crisis days. Another story has Lois meeting Lana Lang for the first time when they are both away at summer camp.

    I would think that DC and its readers would want a young Clark and Bruce at the beginning of their careers, given that teen heroes are popular. For the purpose of moives, they have to make them older to suit the actors--but who wants Superman or Batman to be pushing 40 in the comics?
    That's right, that's right, I'm sad and blue
    'Cause I can't do the boogaloo
    I'm lost, I'm lost, can't do my thing
    That's why I sing "Gimme, gimme dat ding!"

    --The Pipkins (another Tony Burrows one hit wonder)

  5. #20
    Spectacular Member Chris24601's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntoKent17 View Post
    "This is your life"... What story line are you referring to?
    Action 977-978. The aftermath of Reborn where Superman goes and has Kelex shows him the high points of his own life (a la the "This is Your Life" tv series).

    Sorry, given that the arc was literally just last month I figured everyone would know what I was referring to.

  6. #21
    Savior of the Universe Flash Gordon's Avatar
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    Is being Superman really a "career"? Can't Clark just ease into the concept over time?

    That's why it's foolish to me when people say "Superman retired". What does that even mean?? Superman is just what us average citizens call Kal-El. It's the costume he wears while out helping people. Surely he'd never stop helping those in need, and surely he naturally just started being helpful at a young age.

    I like the idea of the "lost years" where Clark roamed around the world and did a lot of kind deeds before surfacing in Metropolis and getting called "Superman" by Lois Lane.

    He's in his 30s at the time of most stories.
    Follow your inner moonlight, do not hide the madness. -Ginsberg

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris24601 View Post
    Action 977-978. The aftermath of Reborn where Superman goes and has Kelex shows him the high points of his own life (a la the "This is Your Life" tv series).

    Sorry, given that the arc was literally just last month I figured everyone would know what I was referring to.
    Ok, but are you sure "Dead Again" and the "break-up" never happened? I wouldn't be so sure about that.
    We know they included in the new continuity "The death of Clark Kent" because of the Kenny Braverman-Conduit image... maybe all the stories of that time are to be included in the New Age chronology...
    Since I'm trying to build up the new continuity... if you have clear info on what is included and what is not, well, please let me know... thanks!

  8. #23
    Mighty Member Adekis's Avatar
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    The Golden Age Superman / Clark Kent was described as a "young man" in narration captions, so I figure that's twenty-five or younger. The Silver and Bronze Age Superman was usually not, but I seem to remember hearing that he started his career as Superboy when he was eight, and I definitely know that he changed his name to Superman during college, so probably eighteen to twenty-two years old. The New 52 Superman appears to have started fresh out of college, so I'd put him at twenty-two even when he first takes to the streets.

    Chris Reeve's started his career at age thirty-one or so, a vast departure from the 25 of George Reeves' version. Since the post-Crisis version revamped by Byrne was, like the Reeve version, designed to have an origin that gives the audience the present-day Superman more or less as-is, he's pretty old in that one too, certainly no younger than twenty-nine, but possibly as old as thirty-three like the one in Zack Snyder's Byrne-inspired Man of Steel film.


    As far as personal tastes go, I prefer for Clark to have such a desire to get out there and be Superman that he'd start really young. He might start going out onto the streets every night after graduating college, but he'd certainly ease himself into it beforehand. In other words, he might start "full-time" at age twenty-two, but he'd be out there not-infrequently even in college, and going all the way back to Jon Kent laughing with his son about the fact that Clark put a repossessed tractor on the bank's roof!
    "You know the deal, Metropolis. Treat people right or expect a visit from me."

  9. #24
    Notorious M.O.S. Kuwagaton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adekis View Post
    Since the post-Crisis version revamped by Byrne was, like the Reeve version, designed to have an origin that gives the audience the present-day Superman more or less as-is, he's pretty old in that one too, certainly no younger than twenty-nine, but possibly as old as thirty-three like the one in Zack Snyder's Byrne-inspired Man of Steel film.
    To the alleged frustration of Byrne, post-crisis Superman was designed to not be as-is. The regular continuity starts without him having a period of learning the ropes. When Carlin came on board, writers started playing up his tenure a bit.

    He made his Metropolis debut seven years after high school. He came out of the matrix, officially born, in winter. So depending on when he started school, he was either 24 or 25 when he suited up. But before the mini series ends, he spends maybe three years as Superman, so he's 27 or 28 when the regular comics start. More like New 52 than the movies.

    One thing I never thought about was GA Superman. It's hard to see him as a very young guy, but he did come from an age when 17 year olds did adult stuff. So 22-ish is entirely possible in 1938 and sets him up well to be active into the sixties.

    SA: the older I get and the more small kids I see, it's crazy to think about an eight year old superhero

  10. #25
    Spectacular Member Chris24601's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntoKent17 View Post
    Ok, but are you sure "Dead Again" and the "break-up" never happened? I wouldn't be so sure about that.
    We know they included in the new continuity "The death of Clark Kent" because of the Kenny Braverman-Conduit image... maybe all the stories of that time are to be included in the New Age chronology...
    Since I'm trying to build up the new continuity... if you have clear info on what is included and what is not, well, please let me know... thanks!
    Stuff happened, but not necessarily the same way as before. Remember, the Kents died before he ever donned the suit so by definition the Death of Clark Kent story had to play out very differently.

    By contrast in Action 978 when discussing the Death/Return event Superman explicitly states that going through that made him decide to NOT wait any longer to marry Lois and that they were married almost immediately after the end of Reign of the Superman story concluded. That's the story DC is running with... that the Proposal/Reveal, Death, Reign of the Supermen and Marriage all occurred within a pretty small span of time.

    If the "Death of Clark Kent" part of Conduit's story happened I suspect that it was AFTER he and Lois were married... heck, it could even be tied into the events that blew up their apartment and put them on the run to the point that Lois gave birth up at the Fortress and then they spent time in California as the replacement for the part of that arc where Clark was laying low with his parents.

  11. #26
    Incredible Member victorsage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Gerard View Post
    Pre-Crisis, he became Superman to pass a lie detector test concocted by a college professor intent on asking him whether he was Superboy. So... 21 to 22 there.
    Ah yes in the Silver Age. The "final Superboy story". In the mid Golden Age he was in his mid to late twenties when Johnathan is on his death bed. Jonathan gives Clark a speech about doing what he could to make the world a better place, and how he was blessed and a true SUPERMAN. After Johnathan dies Clark comes up with the Superman identity.



    In the early Golden Age, Clark Kent is an orphan who grows up and decides to make a difference in the world. First he decides to become a reporter in order to "get newsflashes before anyone else", he then comes up with the costume so the police can't arrest him for his vigilante activities. He seems to be in the same mid to late twenties age as the mid Golden Age story, but it's not solid proof since it's an introductory page and not a full story.

    Last edited by victorsage; 05-17-2017 at 10:33 PM.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris24601 View Post
    Stuff happened, but not necessarily the same way as before. Remember, the Kents died before he ever donned the suit so by definition the Death of Clark Kent story had to play out very differently.

    By contrast in Action 978 when discussing the Death/Return event Superman explicitly states that going through that made him decide to NOT wait any longer to marry Lois and that they were married almost immediately after the end of Reign of the Superman story concluded. That's the story DC is running with... that the Proposal/Reveal, Death, Reign of the Supermen and Marriage all occurred within a pretty small span of time.

    If the "Death of Clark Kent" part of Conduit's story happened I suspect that it was AFTER he and Lois were married... heck, it could even be tied into the events that blew up their apartment and put them on the run to the point that Lois gave birth up at the Fortress and then they spent time in California as the replacement for the part of that arc where Clark was laying low with his parents.
    Uhmmm... I think you may be right about Dead Again and the Break-Up, but definitely The Death Of C.K. must have happened. Of course, without the Kents, it must have happened in a very different way. But that also applies to The Death and Return: without the presence of Conner, the entire Death-Funeral-Reign Of The Supermen-Return run must be rewritten differently.
    And that is the problem: without Conner, a primary piece of ROTS is missing.
    Without the Kents, the Death, The Funeral and other events lack of pathos.

    They are simply not as good as they originally were.

  13. #28
    Notorious M.O.S. Kuwagaton's Avatar
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    Well, "not as good as they were"... we (deliberately) still only have the one version of these stories playing out. That's the point of making the timeline vague. But why does "Dead Again" have to be out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris24601 View Post

    If the "Death of Clark Kent" part of Conduit's story happened I suspect that it was AFTER he and Lois were married... heck, it could even be tied into the events that blew up their apartment and put them on the run to the point that Lois gave birth up at the Fortress and then they spent time in California as the replacement for the part of that arc where Clark was laying low with his parents.
    Could be, it would just have to be merged with the whole Intergang thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by victorsage View Post
    Ah yes in the Silver Age. The "final Superboy story". In the mid Golden Age he was in his mid to late twenties when Johnathan is on his death bed. Jonathan gives Clark a speech about doing what he could to make the world a better place, and how he was blessed and a true SUPERMAN. After Johnathan dies Clark comes up with the Superman identity.
    Many people feel as though pa being alive takes away from Superman seeming like a decisive adult, but pa really just about handed him the whole idea on his death bed, didn't he?

  14. #29
    Mighty Member Adekis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kuwagaton View Post
    To the alleged frustration of Byrne, post-crisis Superman was designed to not be as-is. The regular continuity starts without him having a period of learning the ropes. When Carlin came on board, writers started playing up his tenure a bit.

    He made his Metropolis debut seven years after high school. He came out of the matrix, officially born, in winter. So depending on when he started school, he was either 24 or 25 when he suited up. But before the mini series ends, he spends maybe three years as Superman, so he's 27 or 28 when the regular comics start. More like New 52 than the movies.

    One thing I never thought about was GA Superman. It's hard to see him as a very young guy, but he did come from an age when 17 year olds did adult stuff. So 22-ish is entirely possible in 1938 and sets him up well to be active into the sixties.

    SA: the older I get and the more small kids I see, it's crazy to think about an eight year old superhero
    Oops, You're right. If Clark graduated from high-school at age eighteen as many do, and became Superman seven years later, then he'd be twenty-five. Only the timeskipped years create the illusion that he's "newly Superman" at the end of The Man of Steel - and I do remember hearing that Byrne complained he wasn't allowed to show Superman learning the ropes as much as he wanted, and that had he known it'd be like that, he'd have kept Superboy.

    Also every time I see a twelve year old and think "at that age, Dick Grayson was already on the streets every night" I have to kind of shrug to myself and remember that real kids and fictional kids are not the same, haha!

    Quote Originally Posted by AntoKent17 View Post
    They are simply not as good as they originally were.
    Well yeah, of course they're not. That's why nobody ever shows us a straight up retread of those stories in a new universe, they know we'd get a combination of bored reading stuff we already know and comparing the new material to the old unfavorably.

    Of course, that only seems to apply to stories like Death since we've gotten a half dozen versions of The Super-Duel in Space where Kal first meets Brainiac, but that didn't make as much impact nor take as long as D&R.
    "You know the deal, Metropolis. Treat people right or expect a visit from me."

  15. #30
    Astonishing Member FishyZombie's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Jim Kelly;2813644

    I would think that DC and its readers would want a young Clark and Bruce at the beginning of their careers, given that teen heroes are popular. For the purpose of moives, they have to make them older to suit the actors--but who wants Superman or Batman to be pushing 40 in the comics?[/QUOTE]

    Meh, wouldn't be a big deal to me. the ageist new 52 "everyone must be 25" policy just seemed absurd when the MCU was thriving off actors of the likes of Mark Ruffullo, Jeremy Renner and Robert Dowey Jr. 40 is the new 30, and all that. Obviously though precise ages should be as vague as possible in the funny pages.

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