Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456
Results 76 to 80 of 80
  1. #76
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    58

    Default

    For me, I was always frustrated with the run of issues in 1978-1980 from around #244-269.
    While still riding the wave of popularity from the TV show, the comic book couldn't seem to decide what to do with the character.
    She works for the United Nations and then after Steve Trevor is killed (again) she decides to move to Houston, Texas, and become an astronaut (WTF?) and then after one bad experience there, she quits and moves back to NYC for a few issues and then basically decides she's had it with Man's World and takes off for Paradise Island.
    Gerry Conway takes over in #270 and goes back to basics. He brings back Steve Trevor and moves her back to Washington DC and puts her back in the military with Steve, Etta and General Darnell. From there we get a pretty cohesive run that Roy Thomas and Dan Mishkin build and expand on (rather than dismiss and disregard) up until the end of the series with COIE.

  2. #77
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    44

    Default

    if I had to choose I would say Heinbergs run. I was so extremely excited by the story being set up and for the first time in a LONG time I was actually anticipating the book coming out, and then it went to an every other month schedule and ruined my comic book life. I honestly really didn't enjoy Ruckas first or second run, Eric Luke's run, Jms run, or most of Perez. But the infrequency of Heinbergs run was the worst time for me as a Wonder Woman fan.

  3. #78
    Fantastic Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The I.A.D.C. View Post
    For me, I was always frustrated with the run of issues in 1978-1980 from around #244-269.
    While still riding the wave of popularity from the TV show, the comic book couldn't seem to decide what to do with the character.
    She works for the United Nations and then after Steve Trevor is killed (again) she decides to move to Houston, Texas, and become an astronaut (WTF?) and then after one bad experience there, she quits and moves back to NYC for a few issues and then basically decides she's had it with Man's World and takes off for Paradise Island.
    Gerry Conway takes over in #270 and goes back to basics. He brings back Steve Trevor and moves her back to Washington DC and puts her back in the military with Steve, Etta and General Darnell. From there we get a pretty cohesive run that Roy Thomas and Dan Mishkin build and expand on (rather than dismiss and disregard) up until the end of the series with COIE.
    This is one of my favorite eras simply because it was the run I grew up on (I started at #252). Plus, there were some great stories in there, especially the Jack C Harris stuff.

    Reading through them again as an adult, it does seems like she's all over the place, but in the context of the whole Bronze age, it makes sense. It started with the Diana Prince era, her mother messing with her memories, and Diana losing Steve twice. But even with all the back and forth, I liked how they still managed to tie it together in making Morgan Tracy the mastermind trying to ruin her life, and Diana's increasing frustration with the ways of man's world (that guy Farley delving into Diana Prince's life and finding it fake, and Diana's inability to get her own government file). With Orana's death and Diana being challenged constantly by the gods and Mike Bailey's betrayal, it was like a whole long nervous breakdown that led to her leaving man's world "forever."

    Plus, I love how Mishkin didn't ignore all the drama that had come before. He wrapped it all up by acknowledging all the mind-wiping had been going on, and the discrepancies of the various Steves, so Diana could ultimately process everything that had been happening in the previous 15 years. Against the backdrop of the feminist angst of the 70s, it makes the whole Bronze age of Diana seem like a mythological operatic arc that finished with a happy ending.

  4. #79
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    58

    Default

    [QUOTE=SeanT;2965362]Against the backdrop of the feminist angst of the 70s, it makes the whole Bronze age of Diana seem like a mythological operatic arc that finished with a happy ending

    Huh. I never thought about it like that. I may have to go back and re-visit those issues again.

  5. #80
    BANNED
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    5,445

    Default

    I really need to start reading these thread titles more carefully! o 3o

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •